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Published in Print: September 27, 2000, as News in Brief: A Washington Roundup

News in Brief: A Washington Roundup

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Federal Spending Nearly Doubles in 10 Years

The federal government spent roughly $123 billion on education in the fiscal year that ends this week, nearly twice as much as it did 10 years ago, according to a report by the National Center for Education Statistics.

The federal government spent roughly $123 billion on education in the fiscal year that ends this week, nearly twice as much as it did 10 years ago, according to a report by the National Center for Education Statistics.

That figure represents money from dozens of federal agencies, including the departments of Education, Health and Human Services, Agriculture, and Defense. When adjusted for inflation, spending over the past decade increased by about 55 percent.

The report, issued this month, estimates that the federal share of funding for the nation's elementary and secondary schools declined from 12 percent in fiscal 1980 to 7 percent in fiscal 1990, but has since risen to 9 percent.

It says the Education Department provides far more money for education than any other single agency. Its budget outlays—the actual amount of dollars spent—totaled $40.7 billion in fiscal 2000, which ends Sept. 30.

Copies of "Federal Support for Education: Fiscal Years 1980 to 2000" are available online.(Requires Adobe's Acrobat Reader.)

—Erik W. Robelen


Report Shows Support for School-to-Work Programs

Federally financed school-to-work programs, which promote stronger links between employers and students through internships and other work-related activities, received high marks from the participants, according to a report released last week.

The Public Forum Institute, a nonpartisan, Washington- based group that explores public-policy issues, released "Perspectives on Progress: The School-To-Work National Customer Dialogues." Institute officials surveyed more than 700 educators, parents, and employees in 33 states. The report was requested by the Department of Education's National School-to-Work Office.

Nearly 100 percent of those surveyed said school-to-work programs had increased students interest in careers and better prepared them for college. But a majority of participants said more time and resources were needed to fully develop and sustain their partnerships. Federal funding for the school-to-work program is scheduled to run out on Oct. 1, 2001. States are then expected to assume full responsibility for their school-to-work programs.

The report, "Perspectives on Progress: The School-to-Work National Customer Dialogues," is available online from the Public Forum Institute.

—John Gehring

Vol. 20, Issue 4, Page 26

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