Published Online: January 13, 1999
Published in Print: January 13, 1999, as Federal File


Federal File

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New job for a senator

Carol Moseley-Braun

Carol Moseley-Braun will continue to fight for federal funding for school construction and renovation, but this year from the Department of Education instead of the Senate.

Ms. Moseley-Braun, who lost her re-election bid in November, is joining the department as a special adviser on construction.

The former senator will work part time with the office of intergovernmental affairs to help rally support in Congress for the facilities aid.

School construction, an issue the Chicago native championed throughout her one term as a Democratic senator from Illinois, emerged as a priority in President Clinton's 1997 State of the Union Address.

While Democrats have been unsuccessful in winning funding for such an initiative from the GOP-led Congress, Clinton administration officials have vowed to resume the fight this year.

"Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun has played a very important leadership role in alerting America to the scope and urgency of the nationwide problem of school construction," Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley said in announcing the appointment last week.

IDEA delay

Final regulations for the amended Individuals with Disabilities Education Act are in sight and could be released as early as next week.

The regulations, which will address the 1997 amendments to the law, are being studied by the White House Office of Management and Budget and will then go back to the Education Department for final revisions.

"We're in the home stretch," said Jim Bradshaw, a department spokesman. Department officials planned to meet this week to schedule a final release date.

The rules were first expected to be released last April, but were delayed by controversy over several provisions, most notably those concerning discipline.

Some education groups are hopeful the final document will give schools greater leeway in disciplining disruptive disabled students.

--Joetta L. Sack

Vol. 18, Issue 18, Page 21

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