Published Online: March 11, 1998


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Student curators

Some Seattle 6th graders from Washington and South Shore middle schools will have plenty to put on their r‚sum‚s, thanks to a Seattle Art Museum program.

Students from the two schools are getting the chance to curate an exhibit that is scheduled to open at the museum on April 22. The 60 students are responsible for choosing colors for the gallery walls, selecting the art from museum storage, deciding where to place the pieces, and writing informational text panels to accompany each piece of art.

Students began working on the exhibit last September, with time set aside for the project during their social studies class.

The exhibit, "Reflection in the Mirror: A World of Identity," explores the theme of identity, focusing on African, Asian, Native American, and Western art.

The schools were chosen because they represent underserved communities, said Christina Faine, a spokeswoman for the museum. "The students have an interest in art education, but they wouldn't necessarily have come to the museum with their parents," she said.

An outside assessor will critique the exhibit to help the museum determine what aspects to keep or change for next year's program.

Animal kingdom

When sniffing out the parties responsible for the recent evacuation of three schools in Spokane, Mo., school officials smelled a skunk. Literally.

About 760 students from the southern Missouri town were sent home Feb. 23 after a pair of neighborhood cats rudely interrupted the amorous activities of four mating skunks who had made a love nest beneath a middle school building.

The felines, no doubt, got a noseful. And so did the students and staff, said Dorothy Prewitt, secretary at Spokane Middle School.

"We smelled skunk very strongly," she said. "It kept getting stronger and stronger, and we had to think about our children. We didn't want them getting sick."

"The skunks just found a good place under the school," she said.

A skunk trapper came in and whisked away the furry culprits, and by the next morning, the air was clear again in Spokane.


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