Published Online:

8th Grade Performance

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints
  • CommentsComments

Jump to Math Achievement, Science Achievement, or Steps to Learning Math.

(Countries show in italics did not satisfy one or more guidelines for sample participation rates, age/grade specifications, or classroom sampling procedures.)

Math Achievement
Country Average
Achievement
Singapore 643
Korea 607
Japan 605
Hong Kong 588
Belgium (Flemish) 565
Czech Republic 564
Slovak Republic 547
Switzerland 545
Netherlands 541
Slovenia 541
Bulgaria 540
Austria 539
France 538
Hungary 537
Russian Federation 535
Australia 530
Ireland 527
Canada 527
Belgium (French) 526
Thailand 522
Israel 522
Sweden 519
Germany 509
New Zealand 508
England 506
Norway 503
Denmark 502
United States 500
Scotland 498
Latvia (LSS) 493
Spain 487
Iceland 487
Greece 484
Romania 482
Lithuania 477
Cyprus 474
Portugal 454
Iran, Islamic Rep. 428
Kuwait 392
Colombia 385
South Africa 354

Science Achievement
Country Average
Achievement
Singapore 607
Czech Republic 574
Japan 571
Korea 565
Bulgaria 565
Netherlands 560
Slovenia 560
Austria 558
Hungary 554
England 552
Belgium (Flemish) 550
Australia 545
Slovak Republic 544
Russian Federation 538
Ireland 538
Sweden 535
United States 534
Germany 531
Canada 531
Norway 527
New Zealand 525
Thailand 525
Israel 524
Hong Kong 522
Switzerland 522
Scotland 517
Spain 517
France 498
Greece 497
Iceland 494
Romania 486
Latvia (LSS) 485
Portugal 480
Denmark 478
Lithuania 476
Belgium (French) 471
Iran, Islamic Rep. 470
Cyprus 463
Kuwait 430
Colombia 411
South Africa 326

Steps to Learning Math

The emphasis on understanding is evident in the steps typical of Japanese 8th grade mathematics lessons:

  • Teacher poses a complex, thought-provoking problem.
  • Students struggle with the problem.
  • Various students present ideas or solutions to the class.
  • Class discusses the various solution methods.
  • The teacher summarizes the class's conclusions.
  • Students practice similar problems.

In contrast, the emphasis on skill acquisition is evident in the steps common to most U.S. and German math lessons:

  • Teacher instructs students in a concept or skill.
  • Teacher solves example problems with class.
  • Students practice on their own while the teacher assists individual students.

SOURCE: Third International Mathematics and Science Study.

Web Only

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login |  Register
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Commented