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Call for Papers

April 21--Art: The School of Visual Arts is inviting participants in its 1995 National Conference on Liberal Arts and the Education of Artists, to be held in New York City Oct. 18-21, to submit proposals for open sessions on the following topics: Whither the Arts--The Right, the Left, and the (Dead) Center; Art and Regionalism; Government Funding of the Arts: Pro and Con; Politics and Graphic Design; Politics and the Studio Curriculum; New Challenges to Multiculturalism; Public Television: Yes or No? The National Endowment for the Arts: Blaming the Victim? Revisionism in the Arts and Education; Religion and the Arts; Copyright Laws and the Arts. Those interested should send a 200-word proposal as well as a publication-ready 50-word abstract. Contact: Laurie Johenning, Conference Coordinator, Humanities and Sciences Department, S.V.A., 209 East 23rd St., New York, N.Y. 10010-3994; (212) 592-2624; fax: (212) 592-2633.

Federal Grants

April 28--Education improvement: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Fund for the Improvement of Education program, to support nationally significant programs to improve the quality of education, help all students meet challenging state content standards, and contribute to the achievement of the national education goals. An estimated eight grants ranging from $100,000 to $250,000 each will be awarded to state and local agencies, institutions of higher education, and other public and private agencies. Contact: Office of Educational Research and Improvement/F.I.E. Application, 555 New Jersey Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20208-5645; (202) 219-2053; fax: (202)219-1407.

May 8--Minority education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Grants to Hispanic-Serving Institutions program. The program is intended to help institutions of higher education expand and improve their capacity to serve Hispanic and other students. An estimated 35 awards ranging from $300,000 to $350,000 each will be given to eligible institutions. Contact: Jerry M. Whitlock, U.S.E.D., 600 Independence Ave., S.W., Portals Bldg., Suite 600, Washington, D.C. 20202-5335; (202) 708-9926; TDD: (800) 877-8339.

June 2--Technology: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Challenge Grants for Technology in Education program, to improve and expand new applications of technology to strengthen school reform, improve student achievement, and provide sustained professional development of teachers, administrators, and school library-media personnel. An estimated 18 awards ranging from $500,000 to $3 million each will be awarded to consortia that include at least one local education agency, state educational agencies, institutions of higher education, business, and other appropriate entities. Contact: Interagency Technology Task Force, U.S.E.D., 600 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-5544; (800) USA-LEARN.

Student Scholarships and Awards

April 15--Playwright contest: Entries are due for the 1995 Young Playwrights Program "Call for Scripts," sponsored by Very Special Arts. Students ages 12 to 18 are invited to submit a play script that incorporates some aspect of disability. The young playwrights whose scripts are chosen will travel to Washington, D.C., to participate in final rehearsals and attend their plays' production at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Contact: Y.P.P., V.S.A., Education Office, J.F.K.C.P.A., Washington, D.C. 20566; (202) 628-2800; TDD: (202) 737-0645.

May 1--Music camp: Applications are due for scholarships offered by the National Federation of Music Clubs for instrumental and vocal students to attend sessions at the Stephen Collins Foster Music Camp at Eastern Kentucky University. The instrumental session will run from June 18-June 30, and the vocal session from June 24-June 30. Two awards of $250 each will be given to winning instrumentalists; two awards of $125 of each will go for voice. Applicants must be native or naturalized U.S. citizens. The winners will be selected by tape or live audition. Contact: Robert W. Hartwell, S.C.F.M.C. Director, c/o E.K.U., Richmond, Ky. 40475; (606) 622-3161.

May 15--Video contest: Entries are due for the "Thoughts and Dreams," nationwide school video contest, sponsored by Videonics, a video editing equipment manufacturer, in Campbell, Calif. The contest's goal is to encourage educators and students to use video as a creative, educational tool for communication. All middle school and high schools are invited to participate by submitting a short (less than five minutes long) student-produced video. Ten schools will be awarded a grand prize $2,000 and a complete Videonics Editing Studio. Entries must be produced by students, although faculty mentoring is acceptable. Contact: Videonics, (800) 338-EDIT.

May 22--Essay competition: Entries are due for the "Project: Learn M.S. '95" essay contest, sponsored by the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America. Over $16,000 in scholarship funds are available to any sophomore, junior, or senior high school student. Participants are required to write a 300- to 500-word essay on multiple sclerosis and its effects on the family. Contact: M.S.A.A., (800) 833-4672.

Teacher Fellowships and Awards

April 12--Cable television: Entries are due for the 1995 Cable in the Classroom Innovation Awards sponsored by Colony Communications. The award offers a $500 savings bond to the most creative educators who enter classroom projects that use Cable in the Classroom programs as a supplementary teaching source. Contact: Colony Communications Inc., 20 Washington Place, P.O. Box 969, Providence, R.I. 02901-0969; (401) 277-7400.

April 12--Technology: Applications are due for the "Pioneering Partners for Educational Technology,"grant and scholarship program, sponsored by the Council of Great Lakes Governors and GTE. Open to educator teams in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, the program is geared to teams who have creatively used teamwork and technology in the classroom and prepares them to spread their message about the technology impact on their students. Contact: Pioneering Partners/GTE Telephone Operations, (800) 537-0971 ext. 3888.

April 15--Summer art institute: The National Gallery of Art is inviting applications for its 1995 Summer Institute. The seventh annual art enrichment program is open to teachers of all subjects and grade levels, as well as school administrators and principals. The program information about art and its cultural context and demonstrates techniques for teaching art in six-day sessions held at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. during July and August 1995. Contact: Teacher Institute, Education Division, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 20565; (202) 842-6261.

April 22--Social studies: Nominations are due for grants under the Fund for the Advancement of Social Studies Education general grant program, sponsored by the National Council for Social Studies. The grant is designed to encourage diverse and innovative projects in social studies related to a theme determined annually by the F.A.S.S.E. board. The 1995 theme is "Social Studies Education: Setting the Standards--Making the Difference." Two grants of up to $1,000 each will be awarded among the following categories: K-5, 6-9, 10-12, and college/university (teacher education). N.C.S.S. membership is required. Contact: N.C.S.S., 3501 Newark St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016-3167; (202) 966-7840.

May 24--Summer historical institute: Applications are due for the "Teaching with Historic Places," summer institute for teachers sponsored by the National Parks Service's National Partnerships in Cultural Resources and Training Initiative and the National Conference on State Historic Preservation. The course is open to middle and high school teachers and curriculum specialists and will meet for eight days from July 5-14, 1995 in Washington, D.C. Contact: Teaching with Historic Places, National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service, P.O. Box 37127, Suite 250, Washington, D.C. 20013-7127; or call Marilyn Harper, (202) 343-9546.

May 31--Special Educator of the Year: Entries for the second annual Special Educator of the Year contest sponsored by the Edmark Corporation are due. The contest is designed to honor special educators who are using Edmark product's to make a difference in the lives of their students and inspire other teachers with new ways to help students reach their full potential. The winner will receive a $2,000 gift certificate and the first and second runners-up will receive Edmark gift certificates in the amount of $1,000 and $500 respectively. Educators are asked to submit an official entry form along with a description of an innovative instructional program they have developed for one or more of their students. The instructional program must use at least one specified Edmark product and consist of activities or interactions designed to achieve a particular goal. Contact: Edmark; (800) 362-2890.

June 2--Social Studies Teacher of the Year: Nominations are due for the Outstanding Social Studies Teacher of the Year award. The contest recognizes a current classroom teacher who teaches social studies at least half time in a departmentalized school setting regularly or systematically. Awards are presented for outstanding elementary, middle-level, and secondary teachers. Nominees must have maintained current National Council for the Social Studies membership status for at least two years prior to the nomination date. Each winner will receive a cash gift of $2,500, complimentary N.C.S.S. membership, and a plaque. Contact: N.C.S.S., 3501 Newark St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016-3167; (202) 966-7840.

June 15--'Spirit of America' Award: Nominations are due for the Spirit of America Award, sponsored by the National Council for the Social Studies. The award recognizes an individual in or out of the social-studies field who has made a significant or special contribution that exemplifies the American democratic spirit. Nominees may come from the community at large; nominations may be made by anyone in the social-studies profession. Contact: S.A.A. Subcommittee, N.C.S.S., 3501 Newark St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016.

Oct. 31--Foreign teachers' fellowships: The National Endowment for the Humanities is now inviting applications for its 1996 summer fellowship program for foreign language teachers (K-12). A stipend of $3,750 will be provided for six weeks study abroad. To eligible applicants must have three years full-time teaching (K-12) experience; at least one-half of the teaching schedule in foreign languages during each of those years; be employed by a United States school, or United States school abroad; and have the intent to teach foreign languages at least five more years. Former winners of the program and teachers of ESL and bilingual education are not eligible. Contact: N.E.H. Fellowship Program for FL Teachers K-12, Connecticut College, 270 Mohegan Ave., New London, Conn. 06320-4196; (203) 439-2282; fax: (203) 439-5341.

Other Deadlines

May 15--Welfare to work: Initial abstracts are due for the Transition From Welfare to Work: Small Grants Program, sponsored by the Urban Institute. The program is intended to encourage the continued development of innovative service programs, disseminate information on best practices and exemplary programs, and expand the base of knowledge through policy analysis and research. Five grants of up to $30,000 each will be awarded in each of three categories: program development and innovation; program recognition and dissemination; policy analysis and research. For each category, there will be a two-stage application process; selected applicants will be invited to submit full proposals. Contact: Transitions, U.I., 2100 M St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037; (202) 857-8734; e-mail:

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