Published Online:

Grants

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints
  • CommentsComments

From Private Sources

Charles A. Dana Foundation 745 Fifth Ave., Suite 700 New York, N.Y. 10151

Dyslexia. For support of research and testing to distinguish dyslexic from other children and adults: $280,000 (over three years) to the Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Language-learning disabilities. For support for neuroimaging studies of language-learning disabilities: $350,000 (over three years) to the New York University Medical Center, New York City.

Language-learning disabilities. To develop new strategies for remedying language-based learning disabilities: $450,000 (over three years) to the University of California, San Francisco, Calif.

Language-learning disabilities. For support of research on screening of children at risk for language-learning disorders: $910,000 (over three years) to Rutgers University, Newark, N.J.

Foundation for Child Development 345 East 46th St. New York, N.Y. 10017

Children and families. To support up to two projects to be conducted in Hispanic neighborhoods as part of the Neighborhood Research Grants Program, to develop evaluation measures of comprehensive neighborhood-change initiatives that target families with young children: $130,000 to Projects in Hispanic Communities, Foundation for Child Development, New York City.

Children and families. To support an interdisciplinary seminar series that will recommend approaches to creating supportive neighborhood environments for children and their families living in big cities: $21,505 to the Columbia University School of Social Work, New York City.

Children and families. For general support to meet needs left uncovered by public funds and to continue to serve as a comprehensive family-agency model in a low-income neighborhood with a high concentration of immigrants: $250,000 to St. Christopher-Ottilie Center for Family Life in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, New York City.

Mental retardation. To complete a manuscript that documents a study begun in 1969 on children classified as mentally retarded during their school years: $8,658 to Stephen Richardson, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York City.

Public education and welfare. To develop and operate a new media- and public-education project to deepen public understanding of welfare reform, and to provide information on welfare reform directly to members of the national, state, and local media: $100,000 to the American Public Welfare Association, Washington, D.C.

James Irvine Foundation 1 Market Plaza, Spear Tower Suite 1715 San Francisco, Calif. 94105

Art. Toward artistic-mentorship programs for at-risk youths: $100,000 to the Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, Calif.

Child health. To provide a planning grant to develop an organizational partnership among the Children's Research Institute of California, the Child and Youth Policy Program, and the California Children's Lobby to better serve the health needs of at-risk children, youths, and families in California: $50,000 to the Children's Research Institute of California, Sacramento, Calif.

Child health. For the start-up of the California Center for Lead Housing, a multiservice intermediary whose purpose is to prevent lead poisoning of children through the management and abatement of lead-based paint: $150,000 to the Tides Foundation, San Francisco, Calif.

Child health. For printing and distribution of additional copies of "Young and Healthy in Pasadena,'' a case history of a pilot project in a national series of community success stories in children's health: $5,000 to the Los Angeles Educational Partnership, Los Angeles, Calif.

Children and families. To develop an urban community-development model for building caring families in communities: $40,000 to the Children's Bureau Foundation, Los Angeles, Calif.

Community service. To enable Building Up Los Angeles, a coalition of 29 community-based organizations, schools, and colleges, to plan and implement youth community-service programs: $100,000 to the P.F. Bresee Foundation, Los Angeles, Calif.

Dancing. For the Caravan Project and the Vanguard Ensemble, a training program and performance ensemble for young dancers: $45,000 to the Jazz Tap Ensemble, Los Angeles, Calif.

Filmmaking. To establish a pilot mentoring program that will provide girls from inner-city high schools with professional training in filmmaking: $35,000 to the Independent Feature Project West, Los Angeles, Calif.

National service. Toward the pilot year of Partners in School Innovation, a youth-service corps designed to demonstrate how national-service interns can make major contributions to school change: $60,000 to the Tides Foundation, San Francisco, Calif.

National service. For core support of Youth Service California, to assist California nonprofit organizations, schools, and colleges in the implementation of national- and community-service legislation: $150,000 to Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.

Parent training. Toward implementing the Parent Institute for Quality Education program, which trains parents to become active partners in their children's education: $100,000 to WorldVision Inc., Monrovia, Calif.

Student internships. Toward the pilot year of the Urban Youth Corps, which will place teams of interns at seven community-based, nonprofit service organizations in San Francisco: $30,000 to the San Francisco Urban Service Project, San Francisco, Calif.

Teen programs. Toward the replication of the Teen Outreach Program in California: $50,000 to the Association of Junior Leagues International Inc., New York City.

Violence prevention. To provide enhanced technical assistance to three community-action projects as part of the Violence Prevention Initiative: $10,000 to the California Child, Youth, and Family Coalition, Sacramento, Calif.

Youth programs. Toward Project REACH, an initiative to strengthen and improve the Boys and Girls Clubs in Los Angeles: $250,000 to the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, Pacific Region Center, North Hollywood, Calif.

Youth programs. For salary and planning support for the first full year of independent operation: $78,500 to the Omega Boys Club of San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif.

Youth service. Toward the initial phase of California programs in a national evaluation of voluntary youth-service organizations: $125,000 to Public/ Private Ventures, Philadelphia, Pa.

Youth service. For core support: $100,000 to the Los Angeles Roundtable for Children, Los Angeles, Calif.

From Corporate Sources

Toshiba America Foundation 1251 Avenue of the Americas New York, N.Y. 10020

Biology. To help at least 300 biology students further their understanding of botany, invertebrates, human-blood pathology, and general histology through the use of hands-on laboratory activities: $4,590 to Bolton High School, Alexandria, La.

Distance learning. For a distance-learning project, which will bring instruction and hands-on laboratory activities in chemistry and biology to approximately 80 at-risk students at Dominguez High School in grades 10-11: $8,210 to the California Academy of Mathematics and Science, Carson, Calif.

Earth science. To benefit approximately 560 high school students, who will participate in the Earth Science Enhancement Project, in which students use hands-on materials and laser-disk technology to improve their critical-thinking and investigatory skills: $14,320 to the Wappingers Central School District, Wappingers Falls, N.Y.

Mathematics. For the Special Outreach Initiative, which will provide approximately 75 7th- and 8th-grade minority students with a mathematics curriculum to bridge the conceptual gap between arithmetic and algebra and to prepare students for math studies at the high school level: $10,090 for the Chicago Algebra Project, Chicago, Ill.

Physics. To allow at least 130 physics students to improve their problem-solving skills through the use of cooperative learning, hands-on activities, and interactive software: $9,150 to Whitehaven High School, Memphis, Tenn.

Science. To provide hands-on, experiential instruction in life-, physical-, and earth-science classes to 125 students in grades 7-9: $5,000 to the Hinton Public Schools, Hinton, Okla.

Science. For five "Toshiba Science Grants,'' to be awarded to teams of middle school science teachers for the implementation of hands-on, inquiry-based projects that will enhance the science curriculum for their students: $21,400 to the Fund for New York City Public Education, New York City.

Science. For Science 2000, a project seeking to improve the science curriculum for approximately 1,000 8th graders, to increase their understanding of life, physical, earth, and environmental sciences: $14,010 to the Tustin Public Schools Foundation, Tustin, Calif.

Science. For the "Toshiba Classroom Scholarships for Science,'' program, which will provide 3,000 minority middle school students in New York City with the opportunity to participate in the science museum's exclusive-use day: $10,000 to the New York Hall of Science, Corona, N.Y.

Science. To enable at least 200 11th and 12th graders to investigate real-world problems, work cooperatively on projects, and use current technologies to further their understanding of science applications in the workplace and improve their studies in physics, physiology, criminology, environmental analysis, and industrial chemistry: $9,965 to Mitchell Senior High School, Mitchell, S.D.

Science. To provide 150 minority and/or disadvantaged girls with the opportunity to explore natural science beyond the classroom setting: $9,910 to Girls Inc. and the Dallas Museum of Natural History, Dallas, Tex.

Science. To enable female students in grades 10 and 12 to participate in hands-on group activities that will further their understanding of, and confidence in, studies of biology, physics, and chemistry: $8,670 to Notre Dame Academy, Los Angeles, Calif.

Science. To enable up to 400 students in grades 9-12 to further their understanding of earth, general, life, and physical sciences through the use of interactive video materials: $9,380 to John Carroll High School, Fort Pierce, Fla.

Science and mathematics. To enhance science and mathematics studies for 1,000 students in grades 7-12 throughout six rural districts in northern Maine, through the use of a mobile laboratory: $11,100 to ECO 2000, Van Buren, Me.

Science and mathematics. To enable at least 40 at-risk students in grades 7-10 to use hands-on, curriculum-related activities to explore career and real-world applications of study in the fields of science, mathematics, and technology: $10,000 to Communities in Schools, Dallas, Tex.

Science and mathematics. To four Houston middle and high schools, at which teams of teachers will work to develop and implement creative mathematics and science projects to enhance the current curriculum: $10,000 to Impact II, Houston, Tex.

Science and mathematics. To enable at least 30 physics and advanced- mathematics students to learn the critical connection between math and science by using graphing calculators to collect and analyze data: $7,000 to Wethersfield High School, Wethersfield, Conn.

Toyota U.S.A. Foundation 19001 South Western Ave. Torrance, Calif. 90509

Mathematics and science. To underwrite follow-up educational and recreational activities for girls participating in the "Eureka!'' mathematics and science summer program: $90,000 to Girls Inc., New York City.

Science. For the "Summer Science Camp,'' a four-day course for teachers emphasizing hands-on science in chemistry, biology, and astronomy: $40,000 (over two years) to the Arizona Museum of Science, Phoenix, Ariz.

Web Only

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login | Register
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented