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February 25--Individuals with disabilities: Registration is due for "Transition Into Tomorrow's Workplace,'' national conference, sponsored by Intermediate District #287 in Minneapolis, Minn., and cooperating sponsors, for educators in special and vocational education, employers, individuals with disabilities, families, and rehabilitation counselors, to be held March 11-13 at the Minneapolis Hilton and Towers. Contact: Jane Kist, I.D. #287, District Office--Special Education Services, 1820 N. Xenium Lane, Plymouth, Minn. 55441; (800) 345-4655.

February 25--School scheduling: Registration is due for "The Master Schedule Game,'' workshop, sponsored by the California Testing Bureau/Macmillan McGraw-Hill, for instruction on how to plan, organize, design, and evaluate a master schedule for a school, to be held March 4-5 at the Kansas City Airport Marriott in Kansas City, Mo. Contact: C.T.B./Columbia Master Schedule Building Workshop, 2500 Garden Rd., Monterey, Calif. 93940-5308; (800) 538-9547.

February 26--Education innovation: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Fund for Innovation in Education: Innovation in Education Program-State Curriculum Frameworks for English, History, Geography, Civics, and the Arts Competition program. The program will award grants to support projects that show promise of identifying and disseminating innovative educational approaches at the preschool, elementary, and secondary levels. An estimated 12 awards ranging from $150,000 to $500,000 each will be awarded to state educational agencies or S.E.A.'s working with other entities of their own choice, such as local educational agencies, institutions of higher education, private schools, and other public and private agencies, organizations, and institutions. Contact: Shirley Steele or Seresa Simpson, U.S.E.D., 555 New Jersey Ave., N.W., Room 522, Washington, D.C. 20208-5524; (202) 219-1496.

February 26--Environmental education: Entries are due for the "1993 Seiko Youth Challenge,'' sponsored by the Seiko Corporation of America, for teams of high school students in grades 9-12, to identify, investigate, analyze, and propose a solution to a specific environmental problem facing their own community. Entry is open to as many teams from a single school as wish to participate; students must be supervised by a faculty adviser, who may be the same for all teams or different for each. A team must be composed of two, three, or four students enrolled at any accredited school in the United States during the 1992-93 school year. All members must attend the same school. Submissions must include one title page, followed by a one-page summary, followed by text; the main text of all submissions is limited to no more than 10 single-spaced, typewritten, 8-by-11 pages with one-inch margins. Completed submissions, plus five additional copies, should be sent to: The Seiko Youth Challenge, c/o DRB Communications, 1234 Summer St., Stamford, Conn. 06905; (800) 323-1550.

February 28--Geography: Project submissions are due for the American Express Geography Competition, sponsored by the American Express Travel Related Services Company Inc. and the American Express Philanthropic Program, for 6th- through 12th-grade students and their teacher-sponsors. Students may choose one of three categories to enter: "Managing the Environment in a Changing World,'' "The Geography of Travel and Trade,'' or "Geographic Patterns of Cultural Contact and Cultural Diversity.'' Travel prizes will be awarded to student winners in each category: first place, $15,000; second place, $10,000; third place, $5,000. The teacher-sponsor for each winning entry is awarded $1,500. Contact: Ms. Atlas Map, (800) 395-GLOBE.

February 28--Problem-based learning: Applications are due for "Problem-based Learning: The Institute in Problem-based Learning for Educational Administration,'' sponsored by Stanford University, to be held at Stanford University in Stanford, Calif. . Twenty participants, selected from university-faculty applicants, will study the elements of problem-based learning and how to implement it in administrator-preparation programs. Each participants will receive a $400 stipend. Contact: Edwin Bridges, Stanford University, School of Education, Stanford, Calif. 94305; fax: (415) 725-7412.


March 1--Epilepsy scholarships: Applications are due for the 1993 Parke-Davis Epilepsy Scholarship Program, sponsored by Parke-Davis, for high school seniors and college freshmen, sophomores, and juniors who have epilipsy and who excel in academics and extracurricular activities. Students must be under the care of and being monitored by a physician for their condition; high school students must have applied to a college or university. Fourteen students will be awarded $42,000 in grants and will be recognized at an awards ceremony in New York City on April 24. Contact: Susanna Silverman, Parke-Davis Epilepsy Scholarship Program, c/o Intramed, 1180 Ave. of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036; (800) 972-7503.

March 1--Foreign language: Applications are due for "Materials Development for the Foreign-Language Classroom,'' summer insitute, sponsored by the National Foreign Language Resource Center, to be held at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii. The institute will include discussions and presentations on principles and methods of material design, with special emphasis on the use of "authentic'' reading materials, authentic and "simulated authentic'' listening materials, and television broadcasts. Contact: N.F.L.R.C. 1993 Summer Institute, U.H., Bilger 101, 2545 The Mall, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822; (808) 956-8766; fax: (808) 956-9879.

  • March 1--Music: Applications are due for the Elizabeth Greiger Wiegand Sacred Music of the Faiths Award, sponsored by the National Federation of Music Clubs. Students ages 16 to 25 in piano, organ, or voice, majoring or planning to major in church music, are eligible for the award of $400. Applicants must be N.F.M.C. members and native or naturalized U.S. citizens, and must send a 15-minute monaural tape recording to the chairman, as well as a letter of recommendation from the applicant's teacher. The entry fee is $5. Contact: Marion Williams, 1515 Fifth St., Laporte, Ind. 46350; (219) 362-7286.

March 1-June 1--Principals: Applications are due for the 1993 Vanderbilt International Institute for Principals, sponsored by the Center for Advanced Study of Educational Leadership at Vanderbilt University, for elementary and secondary school principals from the United States, Canada, and abroad, to be held July 4-16 at Peabody College of V.U. in Nashville, Tenn. The institute will focus on research and practice related to administrative problem-solving, school-based management, and school restructuring. Contact: Phillip Hallinger, (800) 288-3357 or (615) 343-7092; or C.A.S.E.L., Box 503, P.C.-V.U., Nashville, Tenn. 37203.

March 5--School scheduling: Registration is due for "The Master Schedule Game,'' workshop, sponsored by the California Testing Bureau/Macmillan McGraw-Hill, for instruction on how to plan, organize, design, and evaluate a master schedule for a school, to be held March 11-12 at the Seattle Marriott Sea-Tac in Seattle, Wash. Contact: C.T.B./Columbia Master Schedule Building Workshop, 2500 Garden Rd., Monterey, Calif. 93940-5308; (800) 538-9547.

March 8--Children with disabilities: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Early Education Program for Children With Disabilities, to provide federal support for a variety of activities designed to address the special problems of infants, toddlers, and preschool-age children with disabilities, and to assist state and local entities in expanding and improving programs and services for such children and their families. An estimated five awards ranging from $140,000 to $160,000 each will be awarded to states that are eligible for grants or cooperative agreements under this competition. Contact: Jospeh Clair, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 4622, Switzer Building, Washington, D.C. 20202-2644; (202) 205-9503.

March 12--Educational equity: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Women's Educational Equity program, for projects that promote educational equity for girls and women, particularly those who suffer multiple discrimination based on sex and race, disability, national origin, or age. An estimated eight general-project grants (84.083A), ranging from $50,000 to $150,000 each, and five challenge grants (84.083B), ranging from $30,000 to $40,000 each, will be awarded to local education agencies, other public agencies and institutions, student and community groups, and individuals. The U.S.E.D. will fund only projects that develop a new education, training, or counseling program, or other programs that increase the interest and participation of women in mathematics, science, and computer science. Contact: Carrolyn Andrews, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 2049, Washington, D.C. 20202-6239; (202) 401-1342.

March 12--School scheduling: Registration is due for "The Master Schedule Game,'' workshop, sponsored by the California Testing Bureau/Macmillan McGraw-Hill, for instruction on how to plan, organize, design, and evaluate a master schedule for a school, to be held March 17-18 at the Salt Lake City Marriott in Salt Lake, Utah. Contact: C.T.B./Columbia Master Schedule Building Workshop, 2500 Garden Rd., Monterey, Calif. 93940-5308; (800) 538-9547.

  • March 12--Special education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Technology, Educational Media, and Materials for Individuals With Disabilities program, to support projects and centers for advancing the availability, quality, use, and effectiveness of technology, educational media, and materials in the education of children and youths with disabilities and for the provision of related services and early-intervention services to infants and toddlers with disabilities. An estimated three awards of $175,000 each for the first 12 months of the project will be awarded to institutions of higher education, state and local agencies, public agencies, and private nonprofit or for-profit organizations. Contact: Linda Glidewell, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 3521, Switzer Building, Washington, D.C. 20202-2640; (202) 205-9864.
  • March 15--Biology: Applications are due for "Focus On Biology: Metaphors of Time and Rates of Change,'' seminar, sponsored by the University of New Hampshire's Center for the Humanities, for high school teachers teaching subjects in the humanities or the sciences, to be held July 5-30 at St. Paul's School in Concord, N.H. Participants will learn about the philosophy and history of biology, the transforming power of modern genetic engineering, and the bioethical impact of the Human Genome Project; teachers will be paid $300 per week for attending the seminar. Contact: The Scientist as Humanist Project, 82 Watchtower Rd., Contoocook, N.H. 03229; (603) 746-4991.

March 15--Developmental educators: Applications are due for the 1993 Kellogg Institute for the Training and Certification of Developmental Educators, to be held June 25-July 23 on the campus of Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C. The program, designed for faculty members, counselors, and administrators from developmental and learning-assistance programs, will deal with current techniques for promoting learning improvement. Contact: Elaini Bingham, Director of the K.I., or Margaret Mock, Administrative Assistant, National Center for Developmental Education, A.S.U., Boone, N.C. 28608; (704) 262-3057.

  • March 15--Education law: Proposals are due for papers and presentations for "With Liberty and Justice for All,'' 39th annual convention, sponsored by the National Organization on Legal Problems of Education, to be held at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel in Philadelphia, Pa. For information and forms contact: Lawrence F. Rossow, College of Education, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. 73019-0260, (405) 366-8220, fax: (405) 325-2403; or NOLPE Office, 3601 Southwest 29th St., Suite 223, Topeka, Kan. 66614, (913) 273-3550.
  • March 15--Foreign language: The National Endowment for the Humanities is inviting applications under its Special Opportunity in Foreign Language Education program, to improve the teaching of foreign languages in schools, colleges, and universities, especially less commonly taught languages such as Russian, Japanese, Chinese, and Arabic. About $2 million for 14 new one- to three-year projects will be awarded to public and private elementary schools, school systems, two-and four-year colleges, and nonprofit academic associations and cultural institutions such as libraries and museums. Contact: Divison of Education Programs, N.E.H., 1100 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Room 406, Washington, D.C. 20506; (202) 606-8373.

March 15--Humanities: The National Endowment for the Humanities is inviting applications for awards under its Masterwork Study program (45.127), for projects that enable elementary and secondary teachers to study topics in the humanities with experts from higher education. Grants averaging $25,000 each will be awarded to schools, school districts, and higher-education institutions. Contact: Ralph Canevali, Division of Education Programs, N.E.H., 1100 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Room 302, Washington, D.C. 20506; (202) 606-8377.

March 15--Humanities: The National Endowment for the Humanities is inviting applications for awards under its Humanities Collaborative Projects program (45.127), for projects between elementary or secondary schools and higher-education institutions, libraries, or museums that bring together instuctors to discuss humanities topics of interest to teachers. Grants averaging $150,000 to $200,00 each will be awarded to local education agencies, schools, higher-education institutions, libraries, and museums. Contact: Michael Lanza, N.E.H., 1100 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Room 302, Washington, D.C. 20506; (202) 606-8377.

  • March 15--Blind musicians: Entries are due for the National Federation of Music Club's Hinda Honigman Scholarship for the Blind, for a blind instrumentalist or vocalist who has reached the 16th but not the 26th birthday by March 1 of the year of auditions. Contact: Carmen Zion, 2268 Lamplighter Ct., West Linn, Ore. 97068; (503) 657-0152.
  • March 15--Service awards: Nominations are due for the 1993 Young American Medals Program, sponsored by the U.S. Justice Department, to recognize young men and women age 18 or younger, in the categories of bravery and service. Each state may nominate two candidates for the bravery medal and two for the service medal. Nominations must be submitted by the governors of the states and territories and the mayor of the District of Columbia. Winners are selected by the Young American Medals Committee, chaired by the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The medals are to be presented by the President of the United States. Contact: Office of Justice Programs, Justice Department, (202) 307-0781.
  • March 15--Student awards: Applications are due for the "Tylenol Cold, Cough, and Sinus Brands Hot Ideas for Schools Awards,'' sponsored by the McNeil Consumer Products Company and the National Association of Secondary School Principals, for students in grades 4-12 in U.S. public and private schools, to recommend projects that would improve learning opportunities for students. The awards, to be made in mid-June, will be presented in three categories: grades 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12. Each winner will receive a $2,500 cash award, plus a $10,000 grant to his or her school to implement the student's idea. Fifty-two runners-up in each category will each earn a $1,000 cash prize and a $1,000 school grant. Contact: Kathy Whittington, (215) 233-7084, or Wendy Camerik, (215) 527-8885.
  • March 20--Blind musicians: Entries are due for the National Federation of Music Club's W. Paul Benzinger Memorial Music for the Blind Performance Awards, to be given for the best performance by an entrant who has not reached the 14th birthday by March 1 of the year of auditions. One $200 award each in the Central, Northeastern, Southeastern, and Western regions will be given. Contact: Doris Cranfill, 417 72nd St., Kansas City, Mo. 64131; (816) 363-587.
  • March 20--Curriculum innovation: Nominations are due for the 1993 Curriculum Innovation Award Competition, sponsored by the Westchester (N.Y.) Area Chapter of Pi Lambda Theta National Honor and Professional Association in Education, to recognize and encourage creativity and excellence among area educators. Teachers of grades 6-12 in the greater Lower Hudson Valley region currently operating innovative programs or projects may be nominated by school personnel, parents, students, or members of the community. The recipient will receive a U.S. Savings Bond and a plaque and will be honored along with his or her chosen administrator at Phi Lambda Theta's annual luncheon in May and at a regular board meeting of his or her school district. Contact: P.L.T. Curriculum Awards Committee, c/o Mrs. Ronnee MacDonald, Chairperson, 8 Forge Rd., Monroe, N.Y. 10950.
  • March 25--School scheduling: Registration is due for "The Master Schedule Game,'' workshop, sponsored by the California Testing Bureau/Macmillan McGraw-Hill, for instruction on how to plan, organize, design, and evaluate a master schedule for a school, to be held April 1-2 at the Richmond Marriott in Richmond, Va. Contact: C.T.B./Columbia Master Schedule Building Workshop, 2500 Garden Rd., Monterey, Calif. 93940-5308; (800) 538-9547.
  • March 26--Youth professionals: Registration is due for "Strategies for Working With Challenged Youth: Awareness to Action,'' 19th annual National Youth Professionals' Institute, sponsored by Work, Achievement, Values, and Education (WAVE), to be held April 4-7 at the Hotel Inter-Continental in Miami, Fla. Contact: Delores Parker, WAVE Inc., 501 School St., S.W., Suite 600, Washington, D.C. 20024; (202) 484-0103.
  • March 29--Computer-based instruction: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Fund for Innovation in Education: Computer-Based Instruction program, to provide support for projects that strengthen and expand computer-based education resources in public and private elementary and secondary schools. Five to eight awards ranging from $50,000 to $200,000 each will be awarded to state education and local education agencies, institutions of higher education, private schools, and other public and private agencies, organizations, and institutions, or consortia of those agencies. Contact: Shirley Steele or Jaymie L. Lewis, U.S.E.D., 555 New Jersey Ave., N.W., Room 522, Washington, D.C. 20208-5524; (202) 219-1496.
  • March 30--History: Applications are due for "Beyond the Industrial Revolution in the Middle School: Teacher Enhancement in Interdisciplinary Studies,'' summer institute, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Tsongas Industrial History Center, to be held July 12-30 in Lowell, Mass. The institute will bring 30 teachers from across the United States together with scientists, engineers, and historians in an effort to discover how topics relating to industrial history can be used effectively within current curricula to stimulate student interest in science and technology. Contact: T.I.H.C., Boott Cotton Mills Museum, 400 Foot of John St., Lowell, Mass. 01852; (508) 970-5080; fax: (508) 970-5085.
  • March 30--Middle school teachers: Applications are due for "Beyond the Industrial Revolution in the Middle School: Teacher Enhancement in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Through Interdisciplinary Studies,'' 1993 summer institute, sponsored by the Tsongas Industrial History Center, for teachers of all subjects, to be held July 12-30 in Lowell, Mass. The institute is designed to show how topics relating to industrial history can be used within current curricula to stimulate student interest in science and technology. Participants will each receive three University of Massachusetts-Lowell graduate credits and a $900 stipend. Contact: T.I.H.C., Boott Cotton Mills Museum, 400 Foot of John St., Lowell, Mass. 01852; (508) 970-5080.


  • April 1--Mathematics and science: Applications are due for "Initiative III'' of the Annenberg/Corporation for Public Broadcasting Math and Science Project, for K-12 teachers, to target the need for new approaches to communicating with the public about math and science education. Applications are invited to develop and to implement new, cost-effective strategies for educating the public, especially parents, about these issues. Up to $1.5 million in funds are available for the projects. Contact: A./C.P.B.M.S.P., Attn: Guidelines, 901 E St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20004-2037; (202) 879-9658.
  • April 1--Mathematics and science: Applications are due for "Initiative IV'' of the Annenberg/Corporation for Public Broadcasting Math and Science Project, for K-12 teachers, to encourage better information sharing among the many educators involved in math and science reform and to encourage the development of new strategies to address math and science reform. The project will award planning grants of up to $75,000; total funds of up to $225,000 are available for the projects. Contact: A./C.P.B.M.S.P., Attn: Guidelines, 901 E St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20004-2037; (202) 879-9658.
  • April 2--'Tech prep': Registration is due for the "1993 National Tech Prep Network Spring Conference,'' sponsored by the Center for Occupational Research and Development, to be held May 3-4 in Anaheim, Calif. The conference is open to all those involved in planning or implementing local tech-prep programs. Contact: C.O.R.D./N.T.P.N., P.O. Box 21689, Waco, Tex. 76702-1689; (800) 972-2766; fax: (817) 772-8972.
  • April 5--Transportation services: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Transportation Services Demonstration Projects program, to provide transportation services in geographic areas that do not have fixed-route transportation or comparable paratransit services for individuals with disabilities who are employed or seeking employment or are receiving vocational-rehabilitation services. An estimated five awards ranging from $300,000 to $500,000 each will be awarded to states and public or private, nonprofit agencies and organizations. Contact: Pamela Martin, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 3414, Switzer Building, Washington, D.C. 20202-2740; (202) 205-8494.
  • April 10--Alternative education: Call for proposals for "Weaving the Future,'' 23rd annual conference, sponsored by Colorado Options in Education, to be held June 24-27 at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colo. The conference is open to representatives from any program, school, or learning community seeking ideas for the redesign of learning, for offering choices for students and parents, or for working with students at risk of failure in their conventional settings. Contact: Mary Ellen Sweeney, C.O.E., 98 North Wadsworth Blvd., #127, Box 191, Lakewood, Colo. 80226; (303) 458-4313.
  • April 10--Childhood education: Submissions are due for "Circle of Inclusion: Families, Children, Schools, Community,'' international study conference, sponsored by the Association for Childhood Education International, to be held March 20-April 2, 1994, in New Orleans, La. The conference will include teachers, teacher-educators, college students, day-care personnel, and other care-givers and will feature symposia on developmentally appropriate practices, family and community involvement, issues and implications of America 2000, professional development, and the alleviation of bias. Contact: Marilyn Gardner, Director of Conferences, A.C.E.I., 11501 Georgia Ave., Suite 315, Wheaton, Md. 20902; (301) 942-2443.
  • April 15--Middle schools: Registration is due for "Activities in Leadership, Independence, Fitness/Fun, and Esteem (LIFE),'' workshop, sponsored by the National Middle School Activities Association, to be held May 8, in Seattle, Wash. The workshop is intended to assist participants in the planning and developing of age-appropriate activity programs for early adolescents. Contact: Joe Bournonville or Bert VanLuyck, P.O. Box 207, Pittsburg, Kan. 66762; (800) 723-5882 or (316) 231-2740.
  • April 30--Education innovation: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Innovation in Education program, which provides grants for projects that show promise of identifying and disseminating innovative educational approaches at the elementary and secondary levels. An estimated seven awards ranging from $100,000 to $300,000 each will be awarded to state education agencies, institutions of higher education, private schools, and other public and private agencies, organizations, and institutions, or consortia of those agencies. Contact: Shirley Steele, U.S.E.D., 555 New Jersey Ave., N.W., Room 522, Washington, D.C. 20208-5524; (202) 219-1496.


  • May 1--Teacher awards: Proposals are due for the National Endowment for the Humanities/Reader's Digest Teacher-Scholar Awards, sponsored by the N.E.H., for elementary and secondary school humanities teachers. The program enables teachers of literature, language arts, history and social studies, and classics and foreign languages to receive support for an academic year of full-time independent study; the grant award is intended to replace, or to supplement other grants and sabbatical pay, up to the amount of the academic-year salary. Contact: N.E.H./Reader's Digest Teacher-Scholar Program, 1100 Pennslyvania Ave., N.W., Room 302, Washington, D.C. 20506; (202) 606-8377.


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