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Legislative Update

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The following are summaries of final actions by legislatures on education-related matters.

MARYLAND

Governor: William Donald Schaefer (D)

FY 1993 state budget: $12.5 billion
FY 1993 K-12 budget: $1.42 billion
FY 1992 K-12 budget: $1.23 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: +13 percent

Highlights:

  • Legislature avoided a "doomsday budget'' calling for severe cuts in state programs by adopting the largest tax package in state history.
  • Budget includes $184-million increase in education-funding formula. Increase is more than offset, however, by reductions in general aid to counties, which heavily funds education.

WYOMING

Governor: Mike Sullivan (D)

FY 1993-94 state budget: $779.4 million
FY 1993 K-12 budget: $490.8 million
FY 1992 K-12 budget: $483.8 million
Percent change K-12 budget: +1.4 percent

Highlights:

  • Figure for 1993-94 state budget does not include separately funded K-12 budget.
  • Governor allowed school-finance measure to become law without his signature because of objections to single-year funding in the face of a projected $70-million deficit for the 1993-94 K-12 budget.
  • $10 million in seed funds for education trust fund, one of several state goals for education adopted last year, was transferred to the general-education fund for one-time use. Water and highway funds were also used for one-time education funding.
  • State goal of class-size reduction in grades K-4 halted for lack of funds.
  • Legislature approved a $1,500 increase in the classroom-unit value in order to maintain a five-year plan to phase vocational-education spending into regular classroom funding.


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