Published Online:

News Updates

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints
  • CommentsComments

The South Carolina Board of Education has voted its "continued support" for a widely used critical-thinking program that some parents had charged could predispose their children to "New Age" religious practices.

The board voted 7 to 6 this month in favor of keeping the "Tactics for Thinking" program on its list of recommended curricula. The program, developed by the Mid-continent Regional Educational Laboratory, a federally funded education-research group, is one of the more popular nationally available thinking-skills programs. (See Education Week, Jan., 30, 1991.)

The program, already in use in dozens of districts in the state, had drawn fire from some parents who said it encouraged Eastern religious practices such as meditation and hypnosis and that it would undermine the value systems they had taught their children.

The program has also run into trouble in several districts in Washington State and Indiana.


North Quincy (Mass.) High School has been ordered to drop its American Indian mascot "Yakoo" and to find a new mascot following complaints that the caricature was a derogatory stereotype.

Schools Superintendent Robert Ricci ordered the symbol removed from the gymnasium floor and from all official documents. The mascot still may appear on student clothing, souvenirs, and publications.

Mr. Ricci's decision overrides a recommendation of a committee of parents, teachers, students, and alumni who last month recommended that the symbol be retained.

The Massachusetts Commission against Discrimination had begun an investigation of North Quincy and another district after the head of the state's Indian affairs office had failed in negotiations to get districts to drop their images of "warlike" Indians. (See Education Week, Feb. 27, 1991.)

The disputed caricature is based on a drawing of Allan H. Yacubian, a 1958 graduate of the school and an Armenian-American who is now a dentist.

Students will be asked to select a new mascot.


A state judge has dismissed a suit filed by four losing candidates in April's elections for the St. Louis school board.

The candidates, members of Friends and Advocates of Neighborhood Schools, had pledged to seek an immediate end to court-ordered student busing in the city. Candidates running on the winning 4 Candidates 4 Kids ticket won all four seats handily. Voters also approved two ballot proposals that had been backed by the 4 Candidates slate. (See Education Week, April 10, 1991.)

The losing candidates filed suit against the winners, charging that widespread voter fraud had led to their defeat. They contended that they would have won the election if a number of improperly cast ballots had been disallowed.

Lawyers for the winning slate argued that not enough cases of potential fraud had been reported to change the outcome of the election. Circuit Judge Edward M. Peek dismissed the suit last week.


A state judge has dismissed a suit filed by four losing candidates in April's elections for the St. Louis school board.

The candidates, members of Friends and Advocates of Neighborhood Schools, had pledged to seek an immediate end to court-ordered student busing in the city. Candidates running on the winning 4 Candidates 4 Kids ticket won all four seats handily. Voters also approved two ballot proposals that had been backed by the 4 Candidates slate. (See Education Week, April 10, 1991.)

The losing candidates filed suit against the winners, charging that widespread voter fraud had led to their defeat. They contended that they would have won the election if a number of improperly cast ballots had been disallowed.

Lawyers for the winning slate argued that not enough cases of potential fraud had been reported to change the outcome of the election. Circuit Judge Edward M. Peek dismissed the suit last week.


A former Georgia teacher of the year who lost her job despite being acquitted on marijuana-possession charges has asked a federal appeals court for a hearing on the incident.

A lawyer for Vicki Sherling told the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit that a federal-court hearing was necessary because the Colquitt school board cited the drugs charges when they dismissed her in 1989.

Mrs. Sherling was arrested along with her husband when police found marijuana plants growing in their backyard. Mr. Sherling pleaded guilty and was sentenced to serve 3 years of a 10-year sentence, but Mrs. Sherling was cleared of any charges. Although she was the 1989 teacher of the year, the board dismissed her. (See Education Week, Sept. 13, 1989.)

As of last week, the court had not ruled.

Web Only

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login |  Register
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Commented