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The Cleveland Board of Education has asked Ohio's tax commissioner for a hearing to object to the city's financing scheme for a proposed Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Developers of the rock hall are proposing a $65-million structure in the city's North Coast Harbor. The city plans to use property-tax revenues from an existing commercial development to retire the yet-to-be-sold construction bonds for the museum.

The board objects to the so-called "tax increment" financing, said Louis C. Damiani, a lawyer for the board. Under the plan, the schools will lose $26 million in property-tax revenues over the next 20 years, he said.

Mr. Damiani said that the board would consider a one-time cash payment of $8 million to $9 million based on the loss of revenues in current dollar value, although it prefers the standard yearly funding procedure.

"We are asking the city for other ways to fund the hall of fame, or pay us what we will lose," Mr. Damiani said.

In a recent letter to the school-board president, James M. Carney Jr., Mayor Michael R. White pledged that abatement measures would be used "prudently," but promised that city officials would use "an aggressive strategy to ... provide jobs for our citizens."

A Southern California school board is offering a $4,000 reward for information leading to the conviction of the person who telephoned death threats to a high-school official following a controversial decision on the selection of cheerleaders.

At a special meeting last week, the board of the William S. Hart Union High School District in Newhall also unanimously decided to support the Canyon High School cheerleading coach's controversial appointment of eight squad leaders without requiring them to try out for the team, William White, the school's principal, said.

Those appointments have prompted allegations of favoritism from parents, he said.

Mr. White said the board concluded it would be unfair to the eight freshman, sophomore, and junior leaders to strip them of their new titles. However, it decided that next year the coach must ask all candidates to qualify through open tryouts before they can assume leadership positions.

Within days after the leaders' selections, Canyon High's assistant principal, Denny Thompson, who oversees the cheerleading program, received three telephone calls from a man threatening him with death unless the coach's decision were reversed.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is continuing its investigation into the threats, Mr. White said.

Federal appeals-court judges in Cincinnati last month upheld a ruling that dismissed a libel lawsuit against The Associated Press for a news story on a community meeting that focused on teacher-misconduct allegations.

A group of 29 educators from Pike County, Ky., sued the news service and five newspapers that published the 1988 story. The faculty members argued that they were defamed and libeled by the report. However, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit found that it would have been unreasonable to believe that each of the 41 faculty members at Phelps High School was singled out by the news report.

The appeals-court ruling affirms a decision by a federal district judge in 1990. The news story focused on a parent meeting that followed a student-teacher altercation on a school-sponsored trip.

A former high-school principal in Kansas has asked a federal appeals court to review a district-court decision not to dismiss a suit against him brought by a teacher who alleged he was not hired for a job because of purported "homosexual tendencies."

In March, a federal district judge refused to throw out the case and denied most points contained in a request for a summary judgment sought on behalf of Cleofas F. Muci, who before his retirement had been principal of Wichita North High School.

Mr. Muci immediately asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit to review the decision.

The case began in 1988 when Mr. Muci declined to hire Vernon R. Jantz, a 45-year-old substitute teacher, for a new teaching slot. The principal reportedly told another faculty member that he did not hire Mr. Jantz because of the latter's alleged homosexual tendencies.

A married father of two children, Mr. Jantz later took another job with the Wichita schools, but filed a job-discrimination suit against Mr. Muci.

In ruling on Mr. Muci's bid for a summary judgment, U.S. District Judge Patrick F. Kelly declared that "discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is invidious."

Two Arkansas school districts have agreed to consolidate into a new 4,000-student system next fall to settle a 1988 federal desegregation lawsuit.

Under the agreement, the Camden district, which is about 70 percent black, will merge with the Fairview district, which is about 75 percent white, according to Jerry Daniel, a school official.

The federal district court in which the suit had been filed is studying the final merger plans, Mr. Daniel said, and is expected to schedule a special mill-rate election to help finance the merger.

Mr. Daniel had been superintendent of the Camden schools and is now an associate superintendent of the joint district.

Elections for a new, seven-member school board to govern the district were scheduled for last week.

Mr. Daniel said the former Camden district did not oppose the consolidation, which was intended to promote racial integration as well as to merge two small districts. Fairview district officials initially opposed the merger, but dropped their objections in court action last fall, he said.

A former high-school principal in Kansas has asked a federal appeals court to review a district-court decision not to dismiss a suit against him brought by a teacher who alleged he was not hired for a job because of purported "homosexual tendencies."

In March, a district judge refused to throw out the case and denied most points of a request for a summary judgment sought on behalf of Cleofas F. Muci, who before retirement had been principal of Wichita North High School.

Mr. Muci immediately asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit to review the decision.

The case began in 1988 when Mr. Muci declined to hire Vernon R. Jantz, a 45-year-old substitute teacher, for a new teaching slot. The principal reportedly told another faculty member that he did not hire Mr. Jantz because of the latter's alleged homosexual tendencies.

A married father of two children, Mr. Jantz later took another job with the Wichita schools, but filed a job-discrimination suit against Mr. Muci.

In ruling on Mr. Muci's bid for a summary judgment, U.S. District Judge Patrick F. Kelly declared that "discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is invidious."

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