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Legislative Update

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The following are summaries of governors' budget requests for precollegiate education and highlights of proposals that rank high on the states' education agendas. Final legislative action on state budgets will be reported in the months ahead.

COLORADO

Governor: Roy Romer (D)

FY 1992 proposed state budget: $2.75 billion
FY 1992 proposed K-12 budget: $1.12 billion
FY 1991 K-12 budget: $1.10 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: + 2.1 percent

Highlights:

Governor proposing to slow down the rate of replacing local property-tax funding of schools with other state revenue. Budget proposes $36-million increase in state education aid, instead of the $70 million called for in school-finance-reform law.

Budget provides $1-million increase for math, science, and technology programs, smaller increases to expand preschool, adult-literacy, and library programs.

Governor proposing "Parents as First Teachers" program to ensure that all parents have access to training to be effective teachers of their children.

MINNESOTA

Governor: Arne Carlson (R)

FY 1992-93 proposed state budget: $14.6 billion
FY 1992-93 proposed K-12 budget: $4.5 billion
FY 1990-91 K-12 budget: $3.8 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: +7.1 percent (adjusted for comparability)

Highlights:

Budget seeks increase in basic per-pupil aid, from $2,953 to $3,050 annually.

Also seeking changes in state-aid formula to direct more resources to elementary education, including an allowance for increased teacher-preparation time in elementary schools.

Other priorities include increased funding for child-health programs and other early-childhood assistance and $7.2 million to train educators in "outcome-based management."

OREGON

Governor: Barbara Roberts (D)

FY 1992-93 proposed state budget: $5.3 billion
FY 1992-93 proposed K-12 budget: $1.96 billion
FY 1990-91 K-12 budget: $1.31 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: +49 percent

Highlights:

Budget includes increase of $633 million in state aid to schools to com pensate for local funding losses caused by property-tax limitation ap proved by state voters in November.

Because of need to make up for losses caused by ballot initiative, budget calls for cuts in a variety of categorical programs, including mentor-teacher, professional-development, and certain special-education programs.

Budget seeks increase in lottery funding of $10.7 million for prekindergarten programs, enabling an additional 1,945 low-income 3- and 4-year-olds to be served.

TENNESSEE

Governor: Ned McWherter (D)

FY 1992 proposed state budget: $9.7 billion
FY 1992 proposed K-12 budget: $1.83 billion
FY 1991 K-12 budget: $1.38 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: +32.6 percent

Highlights:

Budget would provide first-year funding for Governor's proposed 21st Century Schools program; anticipates $627 million in new revenue under tax reforms, including establishment of state's first income tax, tied to school restructuring.

Governor seeking a 4 percent pay raise for teachers, dependent on an economic upturn, in addition to pay hikes scheduled for teachers earning below the state's $27,700 average salary.

Plan would restore $70.4 million in budget reductions caused by this year's revenue shortfalls.

WISCONSIN

Governor: Tommy G. Thompson (R)

FY 1992-93 proposed state budget: $13.1 billion
FY 1992-93 proposed K-12 budget: $4.36 billion
FY 1990-91 K-12 budget: $3.89 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: +11.9 percent

Highlights:

Governor seeking legislation that would break Milwaukee public-school system into at least four separate districts.

Also seeking to limit growth of school-district spending to rate of increase in consumer prices.Other proposals would allow school districts to contract with teachers in private practice; setup a board to set educational goals for the state and monitor districts' progress in meeting them; permit districts to request waivers from state standards to try new programs; create uniform report cards for every school; and administer achievement tests to all students in grades 3, 5, 7, 9, and 10.

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