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Legislative Update

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The following are summaries of governors' budget requests for precollegiate education and highlights of proposals that rank high on the states' education agendas. Final legislative action on state budgets will be reported in the months ahead.


ALABAMA


Governor:

Guy Hunt (R)

FY 1990 proposed state budget:

$7 billion

FY 1990 proposed K-12 budget:

$1.5 billion

FY 1989 K-12 budget:

$1.5 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:

No change


Highlights


Governor has reactivated education commission formed by legislature in 1969, later disbanded. Eight-member panel will study education system and make recommendations.

Also plans to introduce several tax-reform measures following passage of education and general-fund budgets; has postponed until next year a proposal to free up 10 percent of state tax revenues now earmarked for schools.


CONNECTICUT


Governor:

William A. O'Neill (D)

FY 1990 proposed state budget:

$6.97 billion

FY 1990 proposed K-12 budget:

$1.12 billion

FY 1989 K-12 budget:

$1.07 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:

+5 percent


Highlights


Governor proposes new trust fund for K-12 expenditures, to be financed with revenues from new taxes, lottery and other games of chance, and a portion of the sales and real-estate taxes.

Also recommends scaling back increase in aid to districts under new finance formula by $21 million, mostly by cutting aid to wealthier towns.

Legislators back professional-standards board for teachers, rejected by state board of education.


MICHIGAN


Governor:

James J. Blanchard (D)

FY 1990 proposed state budget:

$6.98 billion

FY 1990 proposed K-12 budget:

$2.55 billion

FY 1989 K-12 budget:

$2.41 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:

+6 percent


Highlights


Governor says adoption of his finance-reform plan would raise school aid by $94 million above amount requested. Of $142 million in new funds sought, $105 million would be channeled to poorer districts by requiring more affluent systems to bear greater share of retirement, Social Security, and transportation costs.

Senate Republicans seeking constitutional amendment to raise school-aid fund's share of general-fund revenues from 7 percent to 15 percent.

Governor also seeking legislation on following topics: school restructuring, rewards for school improvement, adoption of core curriculum, welfare reform, youth service.


PENNSYLVANIA


Governor:

Robert P. Casey (D)

FY 1990 proposed state budget:

$11.7 billion

FY 1990 proposed K-12 budget:

$4.4 billion

FY 1989 K-12 budget:

$4.2 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:

+5 percent


Highlights


Governor seeking $8 million to raise minimum teachers' salary from $18,000 to $24,000; $9.5 million to expand teacher-recruiting efforts.

Also seeking more funds for school-improvement rewards; dropout programs; remedial education; Lead Teacher Training Center; forgivable loans for education majors who agree to teach in rural, urban areas.


WISCONSIN


Governor:

Tommy G. Thompson (R)

FY 1990-91 proposed state budget:

$8.4 billion

FY 1990-91 proposed K-12 budget:

$3.4 billion

FY 1988-89 K-12 budget:

$3.0 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:

+13 percent


Highlights


Governor proposes statewide open-enrollment plan, allowing disadvantaged students in Milwaukee to attend any public or nonsectarian private school in the county.

Also recommends $7.5-million "school-improvement fund." Would finance local reform efforts; expand statewide testing in math, reading to 8th grade; provide remediation to 3rd graders who fail reading test; provide cash awards to outstanding teachers in state's nine Congressional districts.

Proposed budget would raise special-education aid by $60 million, largest two-year increase ever; provide Milwaukee with $12 million in desegregation assistance to comply with court's funding order.

Legislature expected to consider proposals to reduce class sizes in early grades; promote foreign-language study in middle and high schools; provide incentives for half-day kindergarten for 4-year-olds, full-day kindergarten for 5-year-olds.

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