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The current student-to-counselor ratio of at least 300 to 1 in many urban districts is a "national disgrace," Ernest L. Boyer, president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, has told a group of college admissions counselors.

Mr. Boyer, whose 1986 study, College: The Undergraduate Experience in America, found that "the path from school to college is poorly marked," recommended that the ratio be cut in half and that counselors be given greater recognition and status within schools.

In addition, he said, college officials must provide accurate information to help students choose the postsecondary institution that is best suited for them. "Educators have a moral obligation to help students and their families make one of life's most consequential decisions,'' Mr. Boyer said at the annual meeting of the National Associ6ation of College Admission Counselors in Seattle.


Parents in Oxford, Kan., had the opportunity this month to relive their "glory days" in high school--and many of them found the experience less carefree than they had remembered.

Richard A. Hayes, principal of Oxford High, invited parents of the school's 119 students to trade places with their children for a day in an effort to improve the school's communication with the community.

The 90 parents who participated had to scramble to keep up with the demands of a typical school day, Mr. Hayes reported. As a result, he predicted, they will be more sympathetic to their children, and will better understand the expectations of teachers.

"When their kids come home tired and cranky, the parents will know why," Mr. Hayes said. "We expect a lot from them."

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