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Calvin M. Frazier, in his last speech as Colorado's commissioner of education, lobbed a few barbs on the subject of leadership at the state's educational hierarchy.

District superintendents have too many responsibilities, school principals often "don't inspire and don't lead," and school-board members are not prepared well enough for their jobs, Mr. Frazier told the Colorado Association of School Executives. He retired Aug. 31 after 14 years as commissioner.

Janice Herbranson, reputed to be the lowest-paid teacher in the United States before her one-room school in North Dakota closed last year, has a new job this fall teaching Mexican immigrant children in a Texas border town.

The 53-year-old teacher, whose $6,800 a year salary earned her appearances on national television and a letter from President Reagan, lost her job in the spring of 1986 when the McLeod, N.D., school closed because of low enrollment--one student. She has more than tripled her salary, to $25,000, by taking the pre-kindergarten teaching position in Progreso, Tex.

Two classes of inner-city schoolchildren--one in Atlanta and one in Chicago--have gotten promises of college scholarships for graduating from high school, through programs inspired by the New York City businessman Eugene Lang.

A group known as 100 Black Men of Atlanta, which includes Superintendent of Schools Alonzo Crim and former Mayor Maynard Jackson, has announced that it will sponsor an 8th-grade class at Archer High School, paying all college expenses for any of the 28 students who enroll in postsecondary institutions after graduation.

In Chicago, Harrison I. Steans, a banker and philanthropist, has promised 37 6th-grade students from the Schneider School at least $1,200 a year for four years of college, if they finish high school.

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