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APPOINTMENTS

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In the Schools

Kathleen G. Velsor, administrative assistant at Newfield High School in Seldon, N.Y., to assistant principal at Cold Spring Harbor (N.Y.) High School.

In the Districts

Manford Byrd Jr., deputy superintendent for systemwide reorganization with the Chicago Board of Education, to superintendent of the district, effective March 25.

Kathleen Byrnes, assistant to the director of the parish-school planning program the Archdiocese of New York, to director of the program.

Clayton A. Dunn, superintendent of schools for the Medical Lake (Wash.) School District, to superintendent of schools for the Pullman (Wash.) School District.

Ann Ganley, principal of Immaculate Conception School in Tuckahoe, N.Y., and a former principal of St. Joseph's Elementary School in Garden City, N.Y., to director of curriculum and testing of the schools of the Archdiocese of New York.

Rose Marie Hawke, a resident of Huntington, N.Y., has been elected president of the Cold Spring Harbor (N.Y.) Board of Education.

Madonna Helbling, director of the parish-school planning program the Archdiocese of New York, to director of parent volunteer programs and special projects for the Office of the Superintendent of Schools for the archdiocese.

Owen M. Henson, associate superintendent of education services for the Topeka (Kan.) Unified School District #501, to interim superintendent for the district.

Carl A. Holmstrom, superintendent of schools for Wheeling (Ill.) Public Schools, to superintendent of schools for St. Louis Park (Minn.) Public Schools, effective Oct. 29.

Robert Kealey, director of curriculum and testing of the schools of the Archdiocese of New York, to dean of The School of Preparation at Manhattan College and consultant to the office of the superintendent of schools for elementary curriculum and testing for the archdiocese.

John A. Murphy, superintendent of schools for the Maine Township school system in the Parkridge, Ill., area, to superintendent of schools for the Prince George's County (Md.) Public Schools.

John A. Osterman, assistant superintendent of plant and personnel for the Quincy (Mass.) Public Schools and for many years a principal at various elementary schools in the district, to superintendent of schools for the district.

Donita J. Pyles, a music teacher for Howell (Mich.) Public Schools, to superintendent of schools for the Shepherd (Mich.) Public Schools.


In the States


Carol Doherty, former president of the Massachusetts Teachers Association, to acting director of the new Center for Teaching and Learning, a state-funded project that was initiated by Gov. Michael S. Dukakis and is in the planning stages.

M. Donald Thomas, superintendent of the Salt Lake City School District, to deputy superintendent of the South Carolina Department of Education, effective Oct. 1.


In Washington


Lorrin Kennamer, dean of the University of Texas College of Education, has been invited to join the Task Force on Educational Technology of the U.S. Education Department.

Anthony Torres, superintendent of Community Consolidated Schools, District 168, in Sauk Village, Ill., will serve a three-year term as member and chairman of the National Advisory Council on Bilingual Education, which advises the U.S. Secretary of Education and the director of the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs.


In the Education Schools


Fay B. Haisley, associate dean of teacher education at the University of Oregon, to dean of the School of Education at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, Calif.

M. J. Stockton, chairman of the Missouri state teachers certification board and professor of education and chairman of the department at William Jewell College, has been named to the Frances S. Evans Chair in Education at the college.

Sam J. Yarger, professor and associate dean of education at Syracuse University, to dean of the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.


In the Associations


Cecil Benjamin, a high-school biology teacher and president of the St. Croix (U.S. Virgin Islands) Federation of Teachers, has been elected a vice president of the American Federation of Teachers. Four other people were also elected for the first time: John Cole, a former English and history teacher of 7th, 8th, and 9th graders in Corpus Christi and president of the Texas Federation of Teachers; Joan-Marie Shelley, who has taught social studies, French, Spanish, and English, and is a member of the executive committee of the San Francisco Labor Council; Marvin Shuman, a former secondary-school mathematics teacher who is president of the Philadelphia local and vice president of the Pennsylvania Federation of Teachers; and Adam Urbanski, a secondary-school teacher of social studies, president of the Rochester local, and a member of the board of directors of the New York State United Teachers.

F. Richard Bird, a social-studies teacher at Shamrock High School in Decatur, Ga., to president of the National Association of Professional Educators.

Arthur G. Broadhurst, assistant headmaster and business manager of St. Edward's School in Vero Beach, Fla., to business manager and director of business services for the National Association of Independent Schools.

Daniel G. Cannon, executive director of the National Art Education Association, to chairman of the art education department and director of the International Art Education Program at Western Oregon State University.

William S. DeJong, assistant executive director of the Council of Educational Facilities Planners International in Columbus, Ohio, to executive director of the National Community Education Association.

David E. Greenburg, a former president of the Council of Administrators of Special Education (a division of the Council for Exceptional Children), to executive director of the council, a newly created position.

Sally A. Greene, director of publications for the Appalachian Mountain Club in Boston and the first editor of its publication, Appalachian Bulletin, to associate director of publications for the National Association of Independent Schools.

Jasper W. Harris, assistant superintendent for special education with the Kansas City (Mo.) Public Schools, has been elected vice president of the Council of Administrators of Special Education (a division of the Council for Exceptional Children).

J. Howard Hinesley, executive assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction with the Pinnellas County (Fla.) School Board, has been elected president of the Council of Administrators of Special Education (a division of the Council for Exceptional Children).

Jerry G. Horn, associate dean of the College of Education at Kansas State University, has been chosen president-elect of the Rural Education Association.

Kenneth H. Humphrey, executive assistant to the superintendent of Weld County (Colo.) School District 6; a former principal of Maplewood, Arlington, and Monfort schools in Greeley, Colo.; and a former teacher at American schools in Italy and Germany, to director of the Colorado North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

Albert Shanker, president of the American Federation of Teachers, was re-elected to that post.

Barbara F. Stock, interim president of The Blake Schools in Minneapolis, to director of academic services for the National Association of Independent Schools.

Robert Van Dyke, executive director of the South Metropolitan Association, an intermediate school district for special education that has its main office in Harvey, Ill., has been chosen president-elect of the Council of Administrators of Special Education (a division of the Council for Exceptional Children).


Other Appointments


Horace Mann, professor of special education at the State University College at Buffalo, has been elected president of the Foundation for Exceptional Children for the 1984-85 school year.


Resignations and

Retirements


James E. Bennett, superintendent of schools for the Harrison County (W.Va.) School System, has resigned his post, effective Nov. 14.

William J. Burkholder, superintendent since July 1982 of the Fairfax County Public Schools, who has worked as a teacher and administrator in the district since 1956, has announced his plans to retire in July 1985.

Father John Hanley, superintendent of education for the Milwaukee Archdiocese since 1971, has retired.

Ray E. Smith, superintendent of schools for the Pullman (Wash.) School District, has resigned to become a part-time professor for the Washington State University College of Education.

Captions for photos:

William S. DeJong

David E. Greenburg

Kenneth H. Humphrey

Beth: October (2files); deadlines

appointments; deaths; ARE YOU PLANNING ad;


DEADLINES


A symbol () marks deadlines that have not appeared in previous issues of Education Week.


October 10--Call for proposals on social studies: Proposals to be considered for presentation at the annual Northeast regional meeting of the National Council for the Social Studies on March 6-9 in Boston. The theme of the conference is "Shaping the Future--Learning From the Past." To obtain proposal forms, contact Joseph S. Lezon, Chairman, 48 O'Neil St., Hudson, Mass. 01749; (617) 562-7313.

October 10--Reading: Call for proposals for presentations to be considered for the 1985 annual conference of the Michigan Reading Association, to be held on March 17-19 in Grand Rapids, Mich. Contact: Helen Johncock, 6450 Sheffield, Hickory Corners, Mich. 49060; (616) 671-5135.

October 15--Education finance: Call for papers and seminar proposals for the annual conference of the American Education Finance Association, to be held on April 11-13 in Phoenix. Send proposals to James L. Phelps, Michigan Department of Education, P.O. Box 30008, Lansing, Mich. 48909, or, for information, telephone (517) 373-3909.

October 15--Honors workshop for mathematics teachers: Nominations of mathematics teachers in grades 6, 7, or 8 to participate in an "all-expense-paid" workshop at Michigan State University on Nov. 28-Dec. 16. The 25 teachers chosen for the workshop, which is being funded by the National Science Foundation, will attend six hours a day of classes each day, and earn six hours of graduate credit in mathematics education. Teachers must be granted paid leave from their schools. Send letters of nomination from the teacher's principal and two of the teacher's colleagues to William Fitzgerald, Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich. 48824.

October 15--Libraries: Applications and nominations of members to serve on the committees of the American Library Association. Contact: Beverly P. Lynch, University Librarian, University of Illinois at Chicago, Box 8198, Chicago, Ill. 60680.


November 1--Arts in education applications for Minnesota: Applications from arts organizations in Minnesota for arts in education programs for the 1985-86 and 1986-87 school years. The program provides grants to established arts organizations with at least three consecutive years of residency experience in primary or secondary schools or in nonprofit educational organizations serving K-12 students. For application forms, write the Minnesota State Arts Board, 432 Summit Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 55102, or call Martha Frommelt (612) 297-2603 or (800) 652-9747.

November 1--Call for proposals on social studies: Proposals to be considered for presentation at the annual Great Lakes regional meeting of the National Council for the Social Studies on March 28-30 in Boston. The theme of the conference is "Global Education in the Social Studies." For proposal forms, contact Denee J. Corbin, Eisenhower School, 2827 Jersey Ridge Rd., Davenport, Iowa 52803.

November 5--Exchange-program scholarships to Japan: Nominations of 11th-grade students will be considered for a summer intercultural exchange program to send pupils to Japan. Funded by the Japanese government and the U.S. Senate, the program is administered by Youth for Understanding. Principals make the nominations through a letter from the state's two U.S. senators. The two students chosen from each state will receive full scholarships to spend eight weeks in Japan and to visit to Washington to meet their senators and the Japanese ambassador. Program announcements were sent to principals in all U.S. secondary schools in mid-September. For more information, contact: Youth for Understanding, 3501 Newark St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016; (202) 966-6800.

November 12--Call for proposals on social studies: Proposals to be considered for presentation at the annual Middle States regional meeting of the National Council for the Social Studies on April 18-20 in Atlantic City. The theme of the conference is "Responsible Citizenship Through Social Studies." For proposal forms, contact Bernice Samalonis, Conference Chairman, 301 East 75th St., #116, New York, N.Y. 10021.

November 16--Mathematics competition for junior-high-school students: Nov. 16 is the last date teachers may order coaching materials and handbooks for their students who want to compete in the annual "Mathcounts Competition," which will begin in December and run through the national finals in May. The competition is sponsored by five national groups: the cna Insurance Company, nasa, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the U.S. Education Department. Contact any state society of the National Society of Professional Engineers or the organization's national office, 2029 K St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006; (202) 463-2310.

November 30--Exchange-program scholarships to Germany: Nominations of 11th-grade students will be considered for an intercultural-exchange program to send pupils to Germany for one year while attending high school. The program is funded by the West German Bundestag, which is the lower house of the federal legislature of West Germany, and the U.S. Congress. It is administered by Youth for Understanding in cooperation with afs International/Intercultural Programs and The Experiment in International Living. Each principal may submit two nominations; 436 students will be chosen to participate. Application materials will be sent to all principals of U.S. secondary schools in early October. For more information, contact: Youth for Understanding, 3501 Newark St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016; (202) 966-6800.


December 1--Research on women in education: Entries of published or unpublished research reports in journal-article format on any aspect of women in education to be considered for the annual "Research on Women in Education Award." The winner of the award will be announced at the American Educational Research Association's meeting on March 31-April 1 in Chicago. Send five copies of the entry (on four of which the author is not identified) to Nancy J. Smith, Research Award Chairman, College of Education, 224 Bluemont Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kan. 66506; (913) 532-5550.

December 7--Women's studies: Abstracts of papers or presentations to be considered for the annual conference of the New York Women's Studies Association and the Oswego Women's Studies Program to be held on April 19-21 at the State University of New York in Oswego. The theme of the conference is "Images and Visions: The New Feminist Scholarship." Contact: Barbara W. Gerber, Conference Program Committee, 611 Culkin Hall, suny at Oswego, Oswego, N.Y. 13126.

December 15--Engineering scholarships for students: Applications from graduating high-school seniors of public, private, and parochial schools in the United States for scholarships administered by the National Society of Professional Engineers Educational Foundation. Contact: nspe Educational Foundation, 2029 K St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006; (202) 463-2330.

December 15--Science talent search: Entry materials from seniors in high school who can demonstrate their research abilities in science or engineering will be considered for cash awards and scholarships. Judging is based primarily on the student's report on an independent research project in the physical sciences, behavioral and social sciences, engineering, mathematics, or biological sciences (excluding live vertebrate experimentation). The contest, known as the "Annual Science Talent Search for the Westinghouse Science Scholarships," will designate 40 winners to share $89,500 in awards and scholarships. Information packets were mailed in late August to every high school in the country. Additional copies may be obtained by writing to Science Talent Search, Science Service, 1719 N. St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036.


January 1--Call for papers on humor: Papers related to the theme, "Humor Across the Disciplines," to be presented at the fourth national whim Humor Conference on March 29-April 1 on the campus of Arizona State University in Tempe. The conference is being sponsored by the Workshop Library on World Humour and the Western Humor and Irony Membership (whim) and will be shaped in large part by the papers submitted. For more information, contact Don L. F. Nilsen, whim, English Department, asu, Tempe, Ariz. 85287; (602) 965-7592.

January 15--Film festival entries: Entries for the annual American Film Festival, sponsored by the Educational Film Library Association, to be held May 27-June 1 in New York City. The festival is a showcase for 16mm films and videotapes for use in libraries, schools, museums, and community programs. Films will be chosen for one cash award and a number of ribbon awards. Contact: Claire Monaghan, Festival Director, efla, 45 John St., New York, N.Y. 10038; (212) 227-5599.

January 15--Grants for improving public high schools: Applications from public high schools for grants ranging from $25,000 to $50,000 under the second phase of the Carnegie Grants Program for High School Improvement, which is sponsored by the Atlantic Richfield Foundation and will be administered by the National Association of Secondary School Principals. Grant application forms have been sent to all public high schools in the country. Contact: Santee Ruffin, Director of Urban Services, nassp, 1904 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091; (703) 860-0200.

January 18--Education-writing awards: Applications and entry fees for "The National Awards for Educational Reporting," sponsored by the Education Writers Association. The grand prize is $1,000 and first prize is $200. Entry forms will be available in early December. Contact: ewa, P.O. Box 281, Woodstown, N.J. 08098; (609) 769-1313.

January 18--'Humane education' award: Nominations of teachers of grades K through 12 for the "National Humane Education Teacher of the Year Award" sponsored by the National Association for the Advancement of Humane Education, which is the education division of The Humane Society of the United States. The award recognizes a teacher who regularly incorporates humane education--"the teaching of appreciation and respect for animals and the environment"--into his or her teaching activities. For nomination forms, contact: naahe, Box 362, East Haddam, Conn. 06423; (203) 434-8666.


March 1--Bilingual education: Abstracts of presentations to be considered for its annual state convention on May 3-4 in Peoria, Ill., sponsored by the Illinois Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages and of Bilingual Education. Contact: L. Schinke-Lllano, 8519 North Karlov Ave., Skokie, Ill. 60076.

March 1--Photograph contest: Photographs from members of the Music Educators National Conference to compete in the first "Music Educators Journal Cover Photograph Contest." The winning photo will appear on the cover of one of the journal's issues. Entrants nust not be professional photographers. Mail entries to: mej, Photograph Contest, menc, 1902 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091.

March 15--Award for research on school nursing: Research papers on school nursing to be considered for the Lillian Wald Research Award. The author of the winning paper will receive $500 and a certificate. Contact the National Association of School Nurses, 7395 South Krameria St., Englewood, Colo. 80112; (303) 850-9033.

March 15--Merit pay: Abstracts of proposed papers to be considered for the summer study conference of the Pennsylvania State University's College of Education on July 8-10 in University Park, Pa. The theme of the conference is "Merit Pay and Career Ladders: Can They Improve Our Nation's Schools?" Contact: Henry C. Johnson Jr., 406 Rackley Building, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa. 16802; (814) 865-1488.

March 31--Cognitive studies: Call for proposals of papers, workshops, and symposia for a conference sponsored by the Institute for Logic and Cognitive Studies of the University of Houston at Clear Lake to be held on July 11-13 in Houston. The theme of the conference is "Logic, Logic Machines, and Public Education." Contact: Paul Wagner, Institute for Logic and Cognitive Studies, uhcl, 2700 Bay Area Blvd., Box 269, Houston, Tex. 77058; (713) 488-9274.


IN FEDERAL AGENCIES


Bilingual education. The Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs of the Education Department announced, in the Sept. 28 Federal Register, that it is accepting grant applications for five programs administered by the department. The programs and theirapplication closing dates are: Bilingual Vocational Training (Nov. 28); Bilingual Vocational Instructor Training (Nov. 28); Bilingual Education Act--state educational agency projects for coordinating technical assistance (Nov. 30); Bilingual Education Act--basic projects program (Dec. 7); and Bilingual Education Act--training projects program (Dec. 28). Contact: Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, ed, Room 421, Reporters Building, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202.

Education data. The Education Department announced, in the Sept. 28 Federal Register, a meeting of the Federal Education Data Acquisition Council on Oct. 15 and 16 in Washington. Contact: Margaret B. Webster, Executive Director, Federal Education Data Acquisition Council, ed, Room 4074, Switzer Building, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 426-7304.

Information-collection requests. The Education Department published, in the Sept. 27 Federal Register, proposed "information-collection requests" from the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services. The Paperwork Reduction Act requires that the Office of Management and Budget give the public and interested federal agencies advance notice and the opportunity to comment on proposed surveys and other requests for information that will be used by the Education Department. Comments must be received by the omb on or before Oct. 29. Contact: Margaret B. Webster, ed, Room 4074, Switzer Building, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 426-7304.

Rehabilitative services. The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services of the Education Department published, in the Oct. 1 Federal Register, proposed regulations for eight programs under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The programs are: the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program; Project Grants and Other Assistance in Vocational Rehabilitation; Centers for Independent Living; Special Projects and Demonstrations for Providing Vocational Rehabilitation Services to Severely Handicapped Individuals; Projects With Industry; Rehabilitation Training; Rehabilitation Long-Term Training; and Rehabilitation Continuing Education Programs. Comments on the proposed regulations must be received by Nov. 15. Contact: Charles Smolkin at (202) 732-1303.

Special education. The Education Department announced, in the Sept. 28 Federal Register, that it is accepting grant applications for two projects under the Secondary Education and Transitional Services for Handicapped Youth Program; Research Projects in Secondary Education, and Cooperative Models for Planning and Developing Transitional Services. Applications must be received on or before Dec. 7. Contact: William Halloran, Research Projects Branch, Office of Special Education Programs, ed, Room 3521, Switzer Building, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 732-1064.

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