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Prepared by Anne Bridgman

Following is a selected bibliography of materials on the subjects of mathematics and science education. The readings, listed chronologically, are not intended to be comprehensive but to suggest the scope of professional concerns and activities over more than a decade.

Books

Goals for the Correlation of Elementary Science and Mathematics: The Report of the Cambridge Conference on the Correlation of Science and Mathematics in the Schools, 1969 (published for the Education Development Center, Newton, Mass., by Houghton Mifflin Company, One Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 02108).

Report of the Cambridge Conference of 1966-67, a gathering of scientists, mathematicians, educators, and others to discuss the need for increased interaction of science and math curricula at the elementary-school level.

New Curriculum Perspectives for Junior High School Science, by Paul DeHart Hurd, 1970 (Wadsworth Publishing Company, 10 Davis Dr., Belmont, Calif. 94002).

The author says social and educational pressures pushed science curricula in new directions, raising questions about the purposes and subject matter of the conventional junior-high-school program of study. Presents experimental instructional practices designed to revitalize teaching.

Common Elements in New Mathematics Programs: Their Origins and Evolution, by Helene Sherman, 1972 (Teachers College Press, 1234 Amsterdam Ave., New York, N.Y. 10027).

An analysis of the history of mathematical concepts used in then-current curricula and an exploration of their application to the movement to improve math education.

Innovations and Changes in Secondary School Science Curricula, by Ahmet Kemal Ozinonu, 1976 (Kalite Printing Co., Ankara, Turkey).

A study of the concept of curriculum and the process of curriculum change by a member of the faculty of arts and sciences at Middle East Technical University. Also an analysis of educational movements to change science curricula.

The Status of Pre-College Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies Educational Practices in U.S. Schools: An Overview and Summaries of Three Studies, 1978 (Directorate for Science Education, National Science Foundation, 1800 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550).

Analyzes the 1978 situation in math, science, and social studies curricula after 20 years of initiatives to improve instruction. Based on a national survey, a series of case studies, and a review of existing literature.

Highlights Report of the 1977 National Survey of Science, Mathematics, and Social Science Education, by Iris R. Weiss, Research Triangle Institute, March 1978 (Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402).

Highlights of a study that surveyed teachers, principals, superintendents, and local district supervisors nationwide to collect information on such topics as the use of federally developed curriculum material, the incidence of attendance at NSF-sponsored conferences, and the qualifications of each discipline's teachers.

A Bibliography of Research and Articles Related to Science Curriculum Improvement Study (SCIS), by Ashley G. Morgan, 1979 (Center for Improving Elementary School Science and Mathematics, Georgia State University, University Plaza, Atlanta, Ga. 30303).

A summary of research studies on science-curriculum improvement through June 1978, including information on teaching styles, learning abilities, reading in science programs, and the background of SCIS, which was developed in 1962 by the National Science Foundation.

Changing School Mathematics: A Responsive Process, edited by Jack Price and J.D. Gawronski, 1981 (published by the American Association of School Administrators, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics; available through nctm, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

Written to assist mathematics educators in carrying out the nctm's recommendations in An Agenda for Action. Also provides information on the general process of change in the schools.

Education in the 80's: Mathematics, edited by Shirley Hill, 1982 (National Education Association, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

A compendium of articles designed to inform educators of the issues facing mathematics teachers in the post-Sputnik era. Covers computer use, women in mathematics, and assessment projects.

Education in the 80's: Science, edited by Mary Budd Rowe, 1982 (National Education Association, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

For science teachers, a resource book that raises questions about teaching science in light of "the current swing of the pendulum" in societal standards. Looks at past problems and possible future solutions.

New Directions in Biology Teaching: Perspectives for the 1980s, edited by Faith M. Hickman and Jane Butler Kahle, 1982 (National Association of Biology Teachers, 11250 Roger Bacon Dr., No. 19, Reston, Va. 22090).

Addressing what they view as the field's current "fork in the road," 10 specialists address the question of what a student should learn about biology to live intelligently and effectively in contemporary society.

The Science Race, by Catherine P. Ailes and Francis W. Rushing, 1982 (Crane Russak and Co., 3 East 44th St., New York, N.Y. 10017).

The Soviet Union is far ahead of the U.S. in science and technology education in terms of courses offered and people trained, argue the authors of this appraisal of the situation.

The Agenda in Action, 1983 Yearbook, edited by Gwen Shufelt and James R. Smart, 1983 (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

Using the eight recommendations of the council's An Agenda for Action as a framework, this collection of articles illustrates the ways in which teachers are making changes in mathematics education.

Images of Science, by Stacey J. Hueftle, Steven J. Rakow, and Wayne W. Welch, 1983 (Minnesota Evaluation and Research Center; available through Wayne W. Welch, 210 Burton Hall, 178 Pillsbury Drive S.E., University of Minn., Minneapolis, Minn. 55455).

The authors, who conducted the 1981-82 National Assessment in Science under a grant from the National Science Foundation and with the cooperation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, summarize and analyze their findings. Includes charts and tables.

Monographs

Psychology of Teaching Thinking and Creativity, edited by Anton Lawson, 1980, (ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education, Ohio State University, 1200 Chambers Rd., 3rd floor, Columbus, Ohio 43212).

Psychological approaches to science teaching by noted theorists, including Piaget, Novak, Lawson, Gagne, and others.

What Research Says to the Science Teacher, in five volumes, 1978-1983 (National Science Teachers Association, 1742 Connecticut Ave. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20009).

Series of monographs designed to identify practical implications of current research for elementary- and secondary-school science teachers. Volume 3, published in 1981, summarizes the results of Project Synthesis, an nsta research effort to synthesize and interpret information from three National Science Foundation studies and the National Assessment of Educational Progress reports. Many of the criteria for "ideal programs"were used to guide nsta's Search for Excellence in Science Education projects of 1982-83.

An Agenda for Action: Recommendations for School Mathematics of the 1980s, 1980 (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

A presentation of the organization's agenda for "a decade of action" and a discussion of the directions mathematics education should take in the 1980's, based on a survey of the opinions of lay and professional people.

Elementary Mathematics: Priorities for the 1980's, by Francis M. Fennell, PDK Fastbacks No. 157, 1981 (Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation, Eighth and Union, Box 789, Bloomington, Ind. 47402).

A study of the impact of past reforms on elementary mathematics curricula and a look ahead to possible changes.

Mathematics Teaching Today: Perspectives From Three National Surveys, by James T. Fey, 1981 (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

Interpretations of the results of three National Science Foundation studies, including a survey of teachers and administrators, case studies of individual schools, and a review of the literature.

Priorities in School Mathematics: An Executive Summary, 1981 (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

An overview of the Priorities in School Mathematics (PRISM) project, a survey conducted by nctm to determine the objectives and priorities of lay and professional people on the subject of changes in mathematics curricula.

Teaching Mathematics: What Is Basic?, by Stephen S. Willoughby, Occasional Paper 31, 1981 (Council for Basic Education, 725 15th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005).

A discussion of the study and teaching of mathematics in the era following the advent of Sputnik in the 1950's and New Math in the 1960's.

Reports

"Report of a Conference on Responsibilities for School Mathematics in the 70's," by the School Mathematics Study Group, Oct. 1970 (The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, Stanford, Calif. 94305).

Suggestions on how to improve mathematics curricula and an examination of whether the curricula of the 1960's were appropriate for the 70's. Includes information on teacher training, research, and evaluation.

"Twenty Years of Science and Mathematics Curriculum Development: The Tenth Report of the International Clearinghouse on Science and Mathematics Curricular Developments," edited by J. David Lockard, 1977 (The International Clearinghouse, Science Teaching Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742).

Detailed information on past and current science and mathematics projects in the U.S. and around the world. Includes a reference directory of projects covered in earlier editions.

"What Are the Needs in Precollege Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies Education? Views From the Field," 1979 (National Science Foundation, 1800 G. St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550).

The results of the nsf's study of the status of science, math, and social-studies education, with a discussion of major problems and issues, the strengths and weaknesses of the present education structure, and the recommendations for improvement.

"The Exeter Conference on Secondary School Science Education," June 15-22, 1980 (Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H. 03833).

The report of a week-long conference of 38 secondary-school science teachers and 10 specialists in the field, on the crisis in science education.

"Science and Engineering Education for the 1980's and Beyond," Oct. 1980 (National Science Foundation, 1800 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550).

Report prepared by the nsf and the Education Department documenting the decline in the general understanding of science and technology among secondary-school students and examining the decreasing priority given to math and science in U.S. schools. Proposes four courses of action aimed at improving curriculum, introducing new technologies, helping teachers,and increasing awareness of career opportunities.

"Education in the Sciences: A Developing Crisis," April 1982 (American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1776 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

Arguing that the secondary-school system is not preparing today's youths to live in a technological society, the aaas offers recommendations for involving the scientific and educational community in reversing the decline in achievement and preparation.

"National Convocation in Precollege Education in Mathematics and Science, Fact Sheet," May 12-13, 1982 (National Academy of Sciences, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418).

Statistics that portray "the generally dismal conditions" in math and science education today, including information on students (enrollments, attitudes, and achievement), teachers (shortages and qualifications), and international comparisons.

"Science and Mathematics in the Schools: Report of a Convocation," by Senta Raizen, National Convocation on Precollege Education in Mathematics and Science, National Academies of Sciences and Engineering, May 12-13, 1982 (National Academy of Sciences, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418).

The report of a convocation of government, industry, and education officials speaking on reversing the current decline in precollege math and science education. (For individual presentations, see listings under 'Other.')

"Mathematics Teacher Shortage: An NCTM Fact Sheet," Aug. 1982 (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

Briefing paper on the national perspective, the condition in selected states, and proposals for solutions to the teacher shortage.

"Today's Problems, Tomorrow's Crises," prepared by the National Science Board's Commission on Precollege Education in Mathematics, Science, and Technology, Oct. 1982 (nsb Commission on Precollege Education, 1800 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550).

The commission's assessment of the condition of precollege education in mathematics, science, and technology in the U.S.

"National Study of the Estimated Supply and Demand of Secondary Science and Mathematics Teachers, 1980-1982," by Trevor G. Howe and Jack A. Gerlovich, Nov. 5, 1982 (Iowa State University, Education Placement Office, E 106 Quadrangle, Ames, Iowa 50011).

The result of an Iowa State University study, this report is a compilation of data designed to identify the specific areas of supply and demand by discipline and by state.

"Interim Report to the National Science Board," Jan. 1983 (National Science Board Commission on Precollege Education in Mathematics, Science and Technology, 1800 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550).

Features information on the purpose and organization of the commission, evidence of growing awareness of the math-science problem, and highlights of the commission's activities to date.

"Report to NSB Commission on Precollege Education in Mathematics, Science and
Technology: A Revised and Intensified Science and Technology Curriculum Grades K-12 Urgently Needed for Our Future," by the Conference on Goals for Science and Technology Education Grades K-12, March 11-13, 1983 (NSB Commission on Precollege Education in Mathematics, Science and Technology, 1800 G. St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550).

An analysis of current data on science and technology education by representatives of the science and technology communities, including recommendations to: increase classroom time spent

on subjects; address the causes of the teacher shortage; and encourage federal, state, and local financial and planning support.

"Report to NSB Commission on Precollege Education in Mathematics, Science and Technology: Fundamentals in Precollege Technology Education," result of a workshop sponsored by the Junior Engineering Technical Society, April 18-19, 1983 (United Engineering Center, 345 East 47th St., New York, N.Y. 10017).

An examination of the current status of precollege technological education and recommendations to the NSB Commission on ways to improve the technological literacy of graduating high-school students.

"Teacher Shortage in Science & Mathematics: Myths, Realities & Research, by Thomas L. Good and Gail M. Hinkel, May 1983 (National Institute of Education; available from eric Document Reproduction Service, P.O. Box 190, Arlington, Va. 22210).

The report of a February 1983 conference sponsored by nie's Improvement of Science and Mathematics Education Team to gather information to guide institute policy on the shortage. Research analyses and reviews and program papers constituted the focus of discussion, and are summarized in the report.

"A Resource Report on Proposed Solutions," by Mary M. Conway, May 1983 (Council for Basic Education, 725 15th Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005).

A document expanding upon an April 1983 cbe conference that focused on teacher-related solutions to the problems in math and science education. Summarizes conference discussions and includes additional information on innovative programs nationwide.

"Action for Excellence: A Comprehensive Plan to Improve Our Nation's Schools," by the Task Force on Education for Economic Growth, June 1983 (Education Commission of the States, 1860 Lincoln St., Suite 300, Denver, Colo. 80295).

Asserting that America's elementary and secondary education system is in a state of emergency, legislators, governors, business executives, educators, and others call for action by states and local communities, a new ethic of excellence in public education, and lasting changes.

Articles in Periodicals

"Federal Programs for the Improvement of School Science and Mathematics," by Thomas D. Fontaine in Science Education, July 1970, pp. 209-12 (John Wiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158).

The deputy assistant director for education of the nsf discusses nsf at the "curriculum crossroads" and issues of funding. Originally presented at the Symposium on School Science--Past and Future, Boston, Dec. 30, 1969.

"Mathematics Education and the Computer Revolution," by Kenneth J. Travers in School Science and Mathematics, Jan. 1971, pp. 24-34 (Official Journal of the School Science and Mathematics Association Inc., 126 Life Science Building, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403).

Author argues that emergence of technology has created a need for a new kind of educated person and explores expected changes in curriculum and instruction of math education as society proceeds into the technological age.

"Technology and a Time of Crisis," by Edgar M. Cortright in Today's Education, Feb. 1972, pp. 50-52 (National Education Association, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

The director of the nasa Langley Research Center recommends ways to deal with increasing technology in our society while maintaining the nation's preeminence in science and technology.

"Science Education in a Changing Society," by David J. Kuhn in Science Education, July 1972, pp. 395-402 (JohnWiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158).

Author examines how to improve the quality of science education in the U.S. and make it more responsive to a changing society, including discussion of individualized instruction, interdisciplinary progams, and increased emphasis on social implications of science.

"Emerging Perspectives in Science Teaching for the 1970's," by Paul deHart Hurd in School Science and Mathematics, Dec. 1972, pp. 765-72 (Official Journal of the School Science and Mathematics Association Inc., 126 Life Science Building, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403).

Originally presented as a speech to the annual School Science and Mathematics Association convention in 1971, author discusses current research on science teaching.

"Is American Science Education at the Crossroads?" by A. Kemal Ozinonu in Science Education, April 1973, pp. 219-25 (John Wiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158).

Professor of science education at Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey, asks whether U.S. science education is on the right track or needs to re-examine its goals, then argues in favor of the latter.

"Science Education for the Future: Tomorrow Never Comes," by Gerald H. Krockover in School Science and Mathematics, Nov. 1975, pp. 639-44 (Official Journal of the School Science and Mathematics Association Inc., 126 Life Science Building, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403).

Discusses problems of preparing teachers to meet rapid changes in the state of scientific knowledge.

"Recommendations and Perspectives for School Mathematics," in Education Digest, Oct. 1976, pp. 16-19 (Box 8623, 416 Longshore Dr., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48107).

Overview and analysis of school mathematics, grades K-12, from the report of the National Advisory Committee on Mathematical Education of the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences, including recommendations for improvements in teacher training and curriculum.

"Toward a Third Century of Science Education," by Rodger W. Bybee in American Biology Teacher, Sept. 1977, pp. 338-41 (National Association of Biology Teachers, 11250 Roger Bacon Dr., No. 19, Reston, Va. 22090).

In the midst of what he terms a "period of crisis," the author looks back at past developments in science education and ahead to its reformation.

"Trends for Mathematics Education," by Wilfred W. Boykin in nassp Bulletin, Dec. 1978, pp. 101-09 (National Association of Secondary School Principals, 1904 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

An examination of the previous 20 years in math education as a basis for thoughts on the curricular future.

"Science Education in the Year 2000: A Need to Look Ahead," by David J. Kuhn in School Science and Mathematics, Jan. 1979, pp. 61-68 (Official Journal of the School Science and Mathematics Association Inc., 126 Life Science Building, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403).

An examination of the factors the author believed would influence science in the next 25 years, including continuing-education programs and international education.

"Science Education in the 1980s," by Leopold E. Klopfer in Science Education, Jan. 1980, pp. 1-5 (John Wiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158).

The editor of Science Education makes predictions for the 1980's based on the 1960-75 "period of ferment and innovation in science education in the United States" and a grim funding outlook, and advocates embuing children with a sense of inquiry.

"Proposed Solutions for Perceived Problems in Science Education--1979," by John W. Renner and Robert E. Yager in Science Education, Oct. 1980, pp. 729-34 (John Wiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158).


The authors offer analyses of and solutions to budget cuts, staff reductions, and other current problems.

"Need for Math Skills Requires Improving Math Instruction," by James J. Gallagher et al. in nassp Bulletin, April 1981, pp. 86-95 (National Association of Secondary School Principals, 1904 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

Based on the "serious problem" of the decline in high-school students' mathematics achievement, Michigan State University math personnel and practitioners discuss the causes of the decline and suggest ways it can be reversed.

"Views from the Field on Needs in Precollege Science, Math, and Social Studies Education," by Alphonse Buccino and Paul L. Evans in Science Education, April 1981, pp. 237-41 (John Wiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158).

Comments from the Science Education Directorate of the nsf on key elements responsible for influencing and shaping science, math, and social-studies education.

"Achievement Test Scores in Mathematics and Science," by Lyle V. Jones in Science, July 24, 1981, pp. 412-16 (American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1515 Mass. Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005).

Average achievement-test scores in math and science have declined since the 1960's, but the scores of students who have intended to proceed to college and major in math- and science-related field have remained stable. The author analyzes these data and their implications for educational policy.

"President's Report, Recipe for Revival: Recommendations for the Twenty-first Century," by Max A. Sobel in Arithmetic Teacher, Sept. 1981, pp. 485-90 (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

Written by the president of the NCTM from the perspective of the year 2001, looking back at the math-education problems of the 1980's, with recommendations for reviving mathematics education in the U.S. Based on a talk.

"Trends in Secondary School Mathematics," by James W. Wilson in Momentum, Dec. 1981, pp. 20-22 (National Catholic Educational Association, Suite 350, One Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036).

Major goals from NCTM's An Agenda for Action, including a discussion of computers, curriculum, and teacher shortages.

"Scientists Call for 'National Commitment' at Senate Hearings," in Science, May 7, 1982, pp. 611-12 (American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1515 Mass. Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005).

aaas officials offer testimony at Senate authorization hearings in April 1982.

"The Problems of Science Education Need Action Instead of Further Study," by Daniel S. Greenberg in Education Week, June 9, 1982, page 19 (1333 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

The Reagan Administration's establishment of a commission to study science education belies the need for action now, the author contends.

"The Role of Science in a New Era of Competition," by George A. Keyworth 2nd in Science, Aug. 13, 1982, pp. 606-09 (American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1515 Mass. Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005).

President Reagan's science adviser and director of the office of science and technology offers thoughts on the role the fields play in the present Administration and the role the scientific community should play in improving education. Adapted from a speech to the aaas Colloquium on Research and Development and Public Policy given June 23, 1982.

"In Search of New Initiatives," by Anna J. Harrison in Journal of Chemical Education, Sept. 1982, pp. 713-16 (Division of Chemical Education of the American Chemical Society, c/o J. Lagowski, editor, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Tex. 78712).

The recipient of the American Chemical Society's acs Award in Chemical Education discusses the leadership that scientific societies, the scientificcommunity, and local organizations must provide to improve the current status of science education. Originally presented as a speech before acs on March 30, 1982.

"President's Report: Math Education for the Mid-80s: Good News and Bad News," by Max A. Sobel in Mathematics Teacher, Sept. 1982, pp. 520-26 (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091). Also in Arithmetic Teacher, Sept. 1982, pp. 60-64 (NCTM, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

At the conclusion of his two-year term, the president of the NCTM presents questions for the next two decades, including the issues of teacher shortages, curriculum, and student motivation. Originally delivered as a speech at NCTM's 60th annual meeting in April 1982.

"Teacher Supply and Demand in Mathematics and Science," by James W. Guthrie and Ami Zusman in Phi Delta Kappan, Sept. 1982, pp. 28-33 (Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation, Eighth and Union, Box 789, Bloomington, Ind. 47402).

A survey of the major causes of the present shortage of math and science teachers in the U.S. and some possible solutions.

"The Crisis in Biology Education," by Robert E. Yager in The American Biology Teacher, Sept. 1982, pp. 328-34 (National Association of Biology Teachers, 11250 Roger Bacon Dr., No. 19, Reston, Va. 22090).

The author recommends educators use this "crisis" as an opportunity to make needed changes to benefit the profession. Includes a review of biology education for the past 32 years, the results of a science-education assessment program, and recommendations for solutions to current problems with the year 2000 in view.

"Why Johnny Can't Compute," by Paul DeHart Hurd in Education Week, Nov. 10, 1982, page 16 (1333 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

The U.S. is losing ground in preparing students for the modern world of technology, says the author in his documentation of the declining quantity and quality of science and math education.

"Perceptions of Professional Problems, Proposed Solutions, and Needed Directions in Science Education," by Rodger Bybee and Robert E. Yager in School Science and Mathematics, Dec. 1982, pp. 673-81 (Official Journal of the School Science and Mathematics Association Inc., 126 Life Science Building, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403).

A synthesis of findings on perceptions of professional problems, proposed solutions to current problems, and recommendations for improving science education as a discipline, based on an examination of six studies: McKenna et al., Yager (both 1979), Butts and Yager,Gallagher and Yager, Renner and Yager (all 1980), and Kahle and Yager (1981). Also offers comparisons of perceptions held by various groups of science educators about their discipline.

"Attitude Is the Reason For Japanese Schools' Success," by Floretta Dukes McKenzie in Education Week, Feb. 16, 1983, page 20 (1333 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

The strong Japanese commitment to education is responsible for the success of Japanese schools, argues the superintendent of the District of Columbia school system.

"High-Tech Rhetoric Belies Students' Real Needs," by Michael W. Kirst and Michael Leonard in Education Week, Feb. 16, 1983, page 20 (1333 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

Efforts to improve students' technological knowledge reflect a fundamental misunderstanding of the "high-tech" revolution.

"On the Drawing Board: A 21st Century Curriculum," by Fletcher Watson in Science Teacher, March 1983, pp. 62-63 (National Science Teachers Association, 1742 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009).

The nsta's Horizons Committee offers recommendations for a balanced education, including a new science curriculum at today's "turning point."

"Scientific Literacy," Volume 112, Number 2 of Daedalus, Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Spring 1983 (Norton's Woods, 136 Irving St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138).

Eleven articles on scientific literacy. Authors include Mary Budd Rowe, on establishing a framework for decisionmakers; J. Myron Atkin, on the improvement of science teaching; and John G. Kemeny, on computer literacy.

"Solving Achievement Problems in Bits and Bytes," by Marc S. Tucker in Education Week, April 27, 1983, page 19 (1333 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

The director of the Project on Information Technology and Education advocates using computers in schools "sensibly"--as tools to solve achievement problems.

"Science Education: A Meta-Analysis of Major Questions," by Ronald D. Anderson, Stuart R. Kahl, Gene V. Glass, and Mary Lee Smith in Journal of Research in Science Teaching, May 1983 (Journal of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, published by John Wiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10016).

The introductory article in this journal analyzes the major research questions in science education and describes a major assessment of existing studies carried out by the Laboratory for Research in Science and Mathematics Education at the University of Colorado. Additional journal articles address the effects of the new science curricula on student performance, the characteristics of science teachers, the effect of "inquiry" teaching and advance organizers, and other issues.

"Math, Science Improvements Must Involve Female and Minority Students," by Holly Knox in Education Week, May 11, 1983, page 24 (1333 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

Recent national efforts to improve math and science education, says the author, must pay attention to the needs of the majority of the student population--female and minority students.

"Math Education--Does It Have the Right Stuff?" by Janet Raloff in Science News, May 28, 1983 (1719 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036).

In a discussion of the findings of the National Mathematics Assessment, the author concludes that schools are not teaching the technological skills students need to live in today's society.

Other

"Testimony to Subcommittee on Science, Research, and Technology of the U.S. House of Representatives," by Donald W. McCurdy in Science and Children, April 1981, pp. 36-37 (National Science Teachers Association, 1742 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009).

Testimony before the House on March 3, 1981 on the national crisis in science and engineering education, including discussion of the shortage of qualified teachers, role of computers, and importance of job preparedness, and a call for funding for science education at nsf

"Testimony Presented to the National Commission on Excellence," by Harold D. Taylor, representing the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, March 11, 1982 (NCTM, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

A California high-school mathematics teacher's testimony urges immediate action by state and federal governments to reverse the current decline in math and science education and stresses the need for a national commitment to improving the education of America's youth.

"Issues in Science and Math Education Perspectives: An Overview From the Department of Education," remarks delivered by Terrel H. Bell, U.S. Secretary of Education, at the National Academy of Sciences' National Convocation on Precollege Education in Math and Science, May 12, 1982 (nas, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418).

A talk on the quality and quantity of math and science education in elementary and secondary schools, including observations on the past 25 years and recommendations for the future.

"Knowledge and Ignorance: The Future of a Free and Robust Society Lies in the Balance," proposed remarks by John B. Slaughter to the National Convocation on Precollege Education in Mathematics and Science, May 12, 1982 (nas, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418).

The director of the National Science Foundation discusses the present situation and economic productivity, suggesting that ignorance threatens our "free and prosperous society."

"Remarks by President Reagan to the National Convocation on Pre-College Education in Mathematics and Science of the National Academy of Sciences," May 12, 1982 (nas, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418).

A reaffirmation of the importance of math and science education as it relates to America's economy and national security, and comments on developing bonds between the private sector and the schools.

"Testimony to Subcommittee on hud-Independent Agencies of the Senate Appropriations Committee of the U.S. Senate in Regard to 1983 Appropriations for the Science Education Component of the National Science Foundation," presented by Sarah E. Klein, president, National Science Teachers Association, May 24, 1982 (nsta, 1742 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009).

Describes the crisis, including the shortage of well-prepared teachers, the role of the federal government in science education, the nsf's 1982 budget for science and engineering education, and educational comparisons between the U.S. and Soviet Union.

"Remarks by Dr. Cecily Cannan Selby, National Science Board Commission on Precollege Education in Mathematics, Science and Technology, Before the House Committee on Education and Labor Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary and Vocational Education," Sept. 28, 1982 (NSB Commission on Precollege Education, 1800 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550).

The co-chairman of the NSB Commission shares research, plans, and recommendations for the future of math, science, and technology education.

"A Proposal for Re-Forming the Secondary School Mathematics Curriculum," by Zalman Usiskin, paper delivered at the 61st annual meeting of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, April 1983 (NCTM, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091).

A proposal, based on the leading national analyses of the current curriculum, for reshaping the high-school math program to emphasize applications of the subject for all students. The author's goal is to reorient the curriculum away from the minority of students who are preparing to be scientists, and toward the broad range of students who need to understand math for more general purposes.

The Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education of the federal eric library system catalogues and publishes reports, documents, informational bulletins, fact sheets, and other publications on the three disciplines. The center has available about 40,000 computer entries on the subject, as well as several hundred of its own publications. Lists of available publications are free, but fact sheets, bulletins, and other publications are available at a "nominal" cost. Users who are able to do an on-line computer search of the eric system can obtain their information within 24 hours or sooner; those who request the eric staff to do their search should assume a minimum wait of two weeks. eric officials report that they processed some 60,000 inquiries last year. For additional information on mathematics and science education, contact eric Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education, Ohio State University, 1200 Chambers Rd., 3rd floor, Columbus, Ohio 43212. Telephone: 614-422-6717.

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