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SENATE

S 2498--Tax-exempt educational institutions. A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code to allow tax-exempt educational institutions to take out loans for new property or improvements and not file them as "acquisition indebtedness" for taxation on unrelated business income. By Senator Matsunaga (D-Hawaii) and one other.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

HR 6276--Student loans. A bill to amend the District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act to allow revenue bonds to be issued to finance college and university programs which provide educational loans to students. By Representative Dymally (D-Calif.) and four others.

HR 6287--Sexual exploitation of children. A bill to amend Title 18 of the U.S. Code to strengthen its provisions, which protect children from sexual exploitation. By Representative Murphy (D-Pa.).

HR 6342--Student loans. A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code to allow the collection of defaulted federal student loans from income tax refunds. By Representative Coleman (R-Mo.).

HR 6343--Student loans. A bill to amend the Title 11 of the U.S. Code to reduce the number of guaranteed student loans that may be defaulted entirely on account of bankruptcy. By Representative Coleman (R-Mo.).


SUBJ:
Hearings

Education Week
Volume 1, Issue 34, May 19, 1982, p 10

Copyright 1982, Editorial Projects in Education, Inc.

Hearings

The following Congressional hearings of interest to those in the field of elementary and secondary education have been scheduled for May. Because times, places, and witnesses frequently change with little advance notice, it is advisable to check with the committees by telephone on or near the appointed dates.

SENATE

Indian education. May 19. Oversight hearing on the implementation of Indian education programs. Contact: Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs (202) 224-2251.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Vocational education. May 19. Hearing on the Reagan Administration's proposed changes in federal vocational-education programs. Contact: House Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education (202) 225-4368.

DEADLINES


May 20--Desegregation assistance: Applications for funding for new and "noncompeting-continuation" projects through the Education Department's Desegregation Assistance Center (dac) programs for race, sex, or national-origin desegregation under the Civil Rights Act. Contact: Jack A. Simms, Director, Equity Training and Technical Assistance, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Education Department, Rm. 2001, FOB-6, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington 20202; (202) 245-8484.


June 1--Mathematics education: Applications from school administrators, supervisors, elementary and secondary teachers, and college-mathematics educators who wish to attend regional conferences on promoting equity for underrepresented groups such as girls, blacks, language-minority students, and Native Americans in mathematics education in the schools. Fifty participants will be chosen for each conference on the basis of their leadership roles in promoting equity in mathematics education. Sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and funded by the National Science Foundation, the conferences will be held in Orlando, Fla., on October 22-23 and in Albuquerque, N.M., on November 19-20. [Two other regional conferences will be held in Baltimore and in Minneapolis in early 1983; the application deadline for these later meetings is Oct. 1.] Contact: Equity Project, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091; (703) 620-9840.

June 1--Media grants in the humanities: Applications for the production of innovative television, radio, and cable projects that use research and information in the humanities and depict issues related to the humanities. Contact: Division of Public Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities, MS 403, 806 15th St., N.W., Washington 20506; (202) 724-0231.

June 2--Dissemination of outstanding curricula: Nominations of school curricula suitable for "adoption" by other public and private schools nationwide. If chosen, these programs will receive dissemination funds from the Education Department's National Diffusion Network to provide in-service training and materials to school districts that wish to "adopt" their particular program. Subject areas must be one of the following: English as a second language, science, reading for grades 5-12, administration, pre-service or in-service training, gifted and talented, writing, foreign languages, educational technology, and computer literacy. Contact Lee Wickline, Director, National Diffusion Network, 1832 M St., N.W., Room 802, Washington, D.C. 20036; (202) 753-7003.

June 8--Museum grants in the humanities: Applications for grants to museums, historical organizations, schools, and other cultural institutions with their own collections to develop programs for the public. Contact: Division of Public Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities, MS 403, 806 15th St., N.W., Washington 20506; (202) 724-0231.

June 15--Library grants in the humanities: Applications for implementation grants for library projects that are designed to interest the public in their humanities resources. The projects might include thematic programs, exhibits, various media, publications, and other library activities. Contact: Division of Public Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities, MS 403, 806 15th St., N.W., Washington 20506; (202) 724-0231.

June 30--School construction: Applications for the funding of new projects under the School Construction Program of the Education Department's office of elementary and secondary education. Funds under this program are provided for the construction of school buildings or temporary educational facilities in districts in which the student populations have increased significantly because of local federal projects. Funds are also available for construction by school districts that serve children residing on Indian lands and by districts that have a small revenue base due to nontaxable federal property. State educational agencies supply application forms and instructions.


July 15--Humanities grants: Applications for program-development grants for projects that will foster appreciation and understanding of the humanities by the public. These programs often extend the humanities resources of urban cultural and educational institutions to non-traditional audiences or bring humanities considerations into public-policy decisions. Contact: National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Special Programs, Program Development Office, Mail Stop 401, 806 15th St., N.W., Washington 20506; (202) 724-0398.

July 15--Teaching economics: Applications from elementary-, secondary-, and college economics teachers, librarians, curriculum coordinators, and school administrators, for 70 prizes that total $11,000 in a contest sponsored by the International Paper Company Foundation. Awards are for innovative educational programs in economics used between July 1, 1981, and June 30, 1982. Contact: Anthony F. Suglia, Coordinator of the National Awards Program for the Teaching of Economics, Joint Council on Economic Education, 1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York City 10036; (212) 582-5150.


August 15--Bilingual-education papers: Submissions of papers to be considered for presentation at the annual international bilingual/bicultural education conference of the National Association for Bilingual Education, to be held in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 15-19, 1983. The theme of the conference is "Bilingualism in the National Interest," and papers should concern education in bilingual/bicultural settings, the role of bilingual education in trade and commerce, or its role in domestic and international security. Contact: Harold Chu, National Association for Bilingual Education's 1983 program, George Mason University's Department of Education, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, Va. 22030; (703) 323-2928.


September 1--Business education: Applications for cash awards to full-time high-school teachers or university faculty members for outstanding classroom techniques or projects that illustrate the beneficial role of private enterprise in this country's economy. Up to 20 awards of $7,500 each and one $15,000 award will be given. Contact: Awards Administrator, Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge, Valley Forge, Pa. 19841; (215) 933-8825.

September 1--Special education: Nominations for awards for outstanding dissertations in the field of special-education administration. Dissertations must have been completed and approved between Sept. 1, 1981, and Aug. 31, 1982. Contact: National Association of State Directors of Special Education's Dissertation Awards, 1201 16th St., N.W., Washington 20036; (202) 833-4218.


October 1--Mathematics education: Applications from school administrators, supervisors, elementary and secondary teachers, and college-mathematics educators who wish to attend regional conferences on promoting equity for underrepresented groups such as girls, blacks, language-minority students, and Native Americans in mathematics education in the schools. Fifty participants will be chosen for each conference on the basis of their leadership roles in promoting equity in mathematics education. Sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and funded by the National Science Foundation, the conferences will be held in Baltimore on Jan. 28-29, 1983, and in Minneapolis on Feb. 18-19, 1983. Contact: Equity Project, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091; (703) 620-9840.


December 6--Media grants in the humanities: Applications for the production of innovative television, radio, and cable projects that use research and information in the humanities and depict issues related to the humanities. Contact: Division of Public Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities, MS 403, 806 15th St., N.W., Washington 20506; (202) 724-0231.

December 13--Museum grants in the humanities: Applications for grants to museums, historical organizations, schools, and other cultural institutions with their own collections to develop programs for the public. Contact: Division of Public Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities, MS 403, 806 15th St., N.W., Washington 20506; (202) 724-0231.

December 16--Library grants in the humanities: Applications for implementation grants for library projects that are designed to interest the public in their humanities resources. The projects might include thematic programs, exhibits, various media, publications, and other library activities. Contact: Division of Public Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities, MS 403, 806 15th St., N.W., Washington 20506; (202) 724-0231.


January 15--Humanities grants: Applications for program-development grants for projects that will foster appreciation and understanding of the humanities by the public. These programs often extend the humanities resources of urban cultural and educational institutions to non-traditional audiences or bring humanities considerations into public-policy decisions. Contact: National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Special Programs, Program Development Office, Mail Stop 401, 806 15th St., N.W., Washington 20506; (202) 724-0398.

IN FEDERAL AGENCIES

Ethnic heritage studies. The Education Department announced, in the May 10 Federal Register, a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Ethnic Heritage Studies on May 25, 9 A.M.-4:30 P.M., and May 26, 9 A.M.-12 Noon, in room 3000 of Federal Office Building 6, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington. The advisory council was established under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to make recommendations on programs and research in ethnic studies. Contact: Wilton Anderson, Chief, Program Assistance and Operations Branch, Education Program Support Division, Room 1167, Donohoe Building, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington 20202; (202) 245-8213.

Commission on excellence in education. The Education Department announced, in the May 11 Federal Register, a meeting of the National Commission on Excellence in Education on May 25 in Room 800 of the Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington. The agenda was also announced. Contact: Milton Goldberg, Executive Director, 1200 19th St., N.W., Washington 20208; (202) 254-7920.

Excellence-in-education hearings. The Education Department announced, in the March 4 Federal Register, the dates of hearings before the National Commission on Excellence in Education. Contact: Milton Goldberg, Executive Director, National Commission on Excellence in Education, 1200 19th St., N.W., Washington 20208; (202) 254-7920. The hearings still to be held are scheduled for the following times and places:

--June 23, 8:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M., on admissions standards, Chicago.

--Sept. 16, 8:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M., on education and the student's life work, Denver.

--Oct. 7, 8:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M., on gifted and talented students, Boston.

Student loans. The Education Department's office of postsecondary education published, in the May 3 Federal Register, the amended family contribution schedule for the Guaranteed Student Loan Program. This amends the schedule that was published in the Federal Register on Sept. 11, 1981, and will apply to loans for instruction between July 1, 1982, and June 30, 1983.

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